Mary Jo Foley

Mary Jo Foley has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications, including ZDNet, eWeek and Baseline. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008). She also is the cohost of the "Windows Weekly" podcast on the TWiT network. Got a tip? Send her an email with your rants, rumors, tips and tattles. Confidentiality guaranteed.

Latest Posts

When Microsoft conspiracy theories spin out of control

When Microsoft conspiracy theories spin out of control

Take off your tin-foil hats, folks. Microsoft has been so completely burned by security problems with Windows in recent years that there is just no way anyone at the company, on down, would suggest users shut off their firewalls, remove their antivirus software or do anything to further comprise the already delicate security balance in which Windows operates.

November 10, 2006 by in Windows

Vista RTM marks the end of an era

Vista RTM marks the end of an era

The expected announcement on November 6 of release to manufacturing (RTM) of Windows Vista is a milestone on many fronts. For one, it’s the end of the Jim Allchin era (and the start of the Steven Sinofsky one), in terms of Windows leadership at Microsoft.

November 7, 2006 by in Microsoft

Microsoft rolls out ERP Live

Microsoft rolls out ERP Live

For some reason, Microsoft isn't calling the hosted versions of its Microsoft Dynamics ERP products "ERP Live." But, in effect, that is what the hostable Dynamics GP, Dynamics NAV, Dynamics SL and Dynamics AX products, rolled out in Munich on November 6 by Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates at the Convergence EMEA conference, really are.

November 5, 2006 by in Microsoft

Office goes gold. Here come the tools

Office goes gold. Here come the tools

The development work on Office 2007 is done, Microsoft confirmed on November 6.The team's work isn't done; now it's time for Microsoft to roll out new distribution, deployment and management tools to convince customers -- especially the usually recalcitrant business ones, for whom older versions of Office work just fine, thanks -- to upgrade.

November 5, 2006 by in Microsoft

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