Lucy Sherriff

<p>Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are. </p>

Latest Posts

Swedish team's graphene mixer opens up THz possibilities

Swedish team's graphene mixer opens up THz possibilities

Researchers at Sweden’s Chalmers University have built a CMOS compatible graphene based electronic mixer – a device that combines multiple input signals into one or two composite outputs – that already works at microwave frequencies and could be extended to the terahertz range.Jan Stake, professor of the research team says that the performance of the mixer can be improved by further optimising the circuit, and improving the on-off ratio.

published January 3, 2012 by

Comments

Non-stick graphene makes anti-glare breakthrough

Non-stick graphene makes anti-glare breakthrough

A collaborative project between Singapore and UK researchers has revealed another useful property of graphene; it can offer protection from laser pulses.Scientists at the National University of Singapore, DSO Laboratories and the University of Cambridge were investigating ways of blocking graphene’s natural tendency to stack and form the more familiar graphite – that’s pencil lead to you and me.

published January 2, 2012 by

Comments

US Airforce investigates holographic quantum computers

US Airforce investigates holographic quantum computers

The US Airforce wants to build a holographic quantum computer, and rather than spending a whole chunk of time going right back to fundamentals, it is working on ways of doing it with off-the-shelf parts and panes of glass.The researchers set out their plans in a paper published in Physics ArXiv.

published December 22, 2011 by

Comments

Entanglement on a chip: Real world quantum computing

Entanglement on a chip: Real world quantum computing

Scientists in Bristol have built and demonstrated a working, programmable photonic chip that "generates manipulates and measures entanglement and mixture". The scientists, whose work is published in Nature Photonics, describe their work as "a major step forward towards optical quantum computing".

published December 12, 2011 by

Comments

Diamonds demo quantum entanglement on a macro scale

Diamonds demo quantum entanglement on a macro scale

Researchers working in the UK’s Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford have demonstrated long range quantum entanglement in two synthetic diamonds, at room temperature.Those last words are the really important ones, because quantum entanglement is a very fragile thing, and generally needs a super chilly environment to be stable.

published December 6, 2011 by

Comments

Graphene ribbons to replace copper on chips?

Graphene ribbons to replace copper on chips?

Not content with taking on the might of silicon, now graphene in all its two-dimensional glory is giving the evil eye to copper. According to an announcement from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, graphene is a promising candidate to replace copper as the size of circuitry on chips shrinks ever smaller.

published November 20, 2011 by

Comments

Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Regular readers may remember the nitrogen vacancy in diamond turning out to be a useful "defect", because even at room temperature it could maintain a spin state for long enough to function as quantum memory.This neat trick prompted researchers to go hunting for similar behaviour around defects in other semiconductors, and now it looks like they’ve found one – in silicon carbide.

published November 2, 2011 by

Comments

Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Regular readers may remember the nitrogen vacancy in diamond turning out to be a useful "defect", because even at room temperature it could maintain a spin state for long enough to function as quantum memory.This neat trick prompted researchers to go hunting for similar behaviour around defects in other semiconductors, and now it looks like they’ve found one – in silicon carbide.

published November 2, 2011 by

Comments

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.

Top Stories