Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can securely reach him on Signal and WhatsApp at 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Charlie Osborne

Charlie Osborne is a cybersecurity journalist and photographer who writes for ZDNet and CNET from London. PGP Key: AF40821B | Research/security tips email: cingred@protonmail.com.

Jennifer Leggio

Jennifer Leggio has been in the security industry for 17 years as a marketer, advisor, and writer. Her focus is on security culture, including disclosure, community issues, equality in security, disruptive trends, and even marketing best practices. PGP Key: 3A708289 | She prefers other contact on Twitter via @mediaphyter.

Latest Posts

Atrivo/Intercage's disconnection briefly disrupts spam levels

Atrivo/Intercage's disconnection briefly disrupts spam levels

After years of operation, California based ISP Atrivo/Intercage, a well known Russian Business Network darling, faced the music and was disconnected from the Internet by its upstream provider at the end of September. What happened according to MessageLabs's latest intelligence report, was a brief decline of spam due to the fact that the malware infected hosts couldn't reach the ISP's netblock.

October 7, 2008 by in Security

Scammers introduce ATM skimmers with built-in SMS notification

Scammers introduce ATM skimmers with built-in SMS notification

The bust of the notorious ATM scammer going under the handle of Cha0 in early September, once again puts ATM skimming in the spotlight. Among the main insecurities scammers face while embedding an ATM skimmer, is the retrieval process of the device that is now containing the credit card details of several hundred people depending on the volume of transactions that occurred while the device was in place.

October 7, 2008 by in Security

Talkback Tuesday: Mobile Malware

Talkback Tuesday: Mobile Malware

Last week I wrote two posts about why I was not concerned about mobile malware right now, but I expected mobile malware to become a problem in the near future. There were several responses to the two posts, including the following:Phatkat writes: Most crackers (hackers gone bad) are doing this for monetary gain so like most people want to put the minimal amount effort to get the maximum gain.

October 6, 2008 by in Security

iPhone hits another security speedbump

iPhone hits another security speedbump

Apple's ongoing struggles with poor security-related design choices have extended to the iPhone.  According to security researcher Aviv Raff, everyone's favorite mobile device is vulnerable to two separate security weaknesses that expose millions of users to phishing and spamming attacks.

October 6, 2008 by in Security

Cybercriminals syndicating Google Trends keywords to serve malware

Cybercriminals syndicating Google Trends keywords to serve malware

In an underground ecosystem that is anything but old fashioned when it comes to abusing legitimate web services, cybecriminals have started exploiting the traffic momentum, and by monitoring the peak traffic for popular search queries using Google's Trends, are syndicating the keywords in order to acquire the traffic and direct it to malware serving blogs primarily hosted at Windows Live's Spaces.

October 2, 2008 by in Security

Well, I do actually worry (about mobile viruses)

Well, I do actually worry (about mobile viruses)

In response to Kaspersky's statement that they were concerned about mobile malware, I provided a flurry of reasons why mobile malware epidemics don't occur today. This may not be the case in the near future, however, as changes in the handset space is making the creation of malware far more attractive.

October 2, 2008 by in Mobility

Infamous vendor of "AntiVirus XP" badware sued

Infamous vendor of "AntiVirus XP" badware sued

The software purveyor behind AntiVirus XP, a fake anti-virus package, has been sued and will hopefully be put out of business.There has been plenty of information available on this organization for some time, yet unsuspecting consumers continue to hand over their own money for what amounts to malware.

September 30, 2008 by in Enterprise Software

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