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Google

Google took a simple concept - text keywords - and became an Internet leader. In most markets, Google has the search market share lead and management is looking to expand into new markets. The search giant hasn't quite found its next big hit, but Google Apps and Android are promising extensions of the business. The game plan for Google: Expand into new markets like mobile and grow advertising revenue. Google is also dabbling in everything from broadband to power management to alternative energy. The company is well positioned to benefit from cloud computing and the consumerization of IT.

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Articles about Google

January 5, 2010 by in Mobility

Google introduces the Nexus One smartphone

At Google's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., Google VP of Product Management Mario Queiroz and Android Senior Product Manager Erick Tseng demo the new Google Nexus One smartphone, or as he calls it, "superphone." The new phone is made with HTC hardware and runs Google's Android 2.1 OS. Some of the features include GPS with Google Maps and turn-by-turn navigation, an accelerometer, a virtual keyboard, a light sensor for adjusting the display to save battery power, a proximity sensor, a compass, a 5-megapixel camera with an LED flash, Wi-Fi, a new media gallery interface with access to Picasa and YouTube, Facebook access, and stereo Bluetooth.

December 15, 2009 by in Collaboration

Do you Google Wave?

If you want attention online, then mention that you have a couple of Google Wave invites to giveaway and watch all manner of people you've never met pander to be worthy of your generosity. But what about in the real world? Do people even know what Google Wave is?

December 15, 2009 by in Collaboration

The decade in tech: Top 5 stories of the 00s

From the Google IPO, to the rise of social networking, it's been an important decade for tech innovation, CBSNews.com Executive Editor Charles Cooper talks to ZDNet Editor in Chief Larry Dignan about the five most important tech events of the decade and what they mean for the technology industry going forward.

August 10, 2009 by in Hardware

Apple's app flap: Don't blame AT&T

ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz shares his views on the recent iPhone related controversy--Apple’s rejection of Google Voice. He says, AT&T was not behind the app rejection and that Apple should adopt it because it has already approved other VoIP apps such as Skype.

July 30, 2009 by in iPhone

Which smartphone platform should developers aim for?

For start-ups without a lot of time or money, is it smarter to develop for the iPhone first or the Android OS? Panelists at the AlwaysOn Summit at Stanford discuss the pros and cons of each platform. With 65,000 apps available, the iPhone may be the most popular smartphone, but that also means that many more apps can eclipse yours. Panelists include Purnima Kochikar, vice president of the Nokia Community and Developer Forum; Dorrian Porter, CEO of Mozes; Simon Khalaf, CEO of Flurry; and moderator Mark Newhall, co-founder of IdealWave Solutions and INmobile.org.

July 30, 2009 by in Google

Open-source bonuses for the big guys

At the AlwaysOn Summit at Stanford University, panelists discuss benefits that huge companies like Google and Facebook could get from embracing open source, such as third-party developers integrating their products into new application versions and easier connectivity with emerging technologies. Panelists include Ron Yekutiel, CEO of Kaltura; Kim Polese, CEO of SpikeSource; and moderator Matt Asay, vice president of business development at Alfresco and a member of the CNET Blog Network.

July 14, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

Beyond Google AdSense: Monetizing smaller Web sites

What can small companies and start-ups without huge audience numbers do to earn money from their Web sites? At the Revenue Bootcamp Conference in Mountain View, Calif., panelists discuss pay-per-click ads, and why they might not be the best model for small companies. Rather, they say, finding a single sponsor or targeting a more specific audience could be a better strategy. Panelists include: Neil Chase, vice president of Author Services at Federated Media; Samir Arora, chairman and CEO of Glam Media; and David Kopp, senior director of North American ads at Yahoo. Moderator: Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures.

May 27, 2009 by in CXO

Google CEO touts always-on computing

At the Google I/O developer's conference in San Francisco, Calif., company CEO Eric Schmidt shares his vision for a new computing paradigm. In his keynote, Schmidt says "this is the beginning of the real win of cloud computing, of applications."

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