Processors

Chips are everywhere. Processors are in your PCs, laptops, servers, cars and every gadget you can think of. In addition, the processor market is shifting---especially in the mobile market. Key trend: Graphical processing units. Key players include Intel, AMD, Nvidia, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments among others.

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Articles about Processors

The race to the FinFETs

The race to the FinFETs

Chip makers are racing to complete new technology with 3-D transistors to meet demand for mobile devices that are faster and more efficient.

published October 2, 2014 by

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Hands on with Seagate's GoFlex Satellite

Hands on with Seagate's GoFlex Satellite

Storage space on the iPad 2 (and most other tablets) is limited to 64GB maximum. Without a USB port or an SD card slot, it's nearly impossible to add on room for more multimedia. Seagate's GoFlex Satellite is trying to fill this void.

published May 18, 2011 by

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Motorola Atrix photos: The docking smartphone

Motorola Atrix photos: The docking smartphone

The Motorola Atrix is one of the most innovative smartphones of 2011. It broke new ground with a dual core processor and 1.0GB of RAM, but it's best known feature is its ability to dock and turn into a desktop or laptop PC. Here is the unboxing of the Atrix as well as full photos of its docking accessories.

published April 13, 2011 by

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Hands-on with the T-Mobile Dell Streak 7

Hands-on with the T-Mobile Dell Streak 7

The next Android tablet for T-Mobile is launching soon as the Dell Streak 7. While the Streak 7 has an NVIDIA Tegra 2 dual-core processor, HSPA+ 21 Mbps support. and $199.99 price after contract, the low resolution display and limited battery life make it a device to skip as better devices are available now or coming soon.

published January 31, 2011 by

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The cost of creating solar cells

At the Always On Venture Summit in Half Moon Bay, Calif., a panel of solar energy executives debates whether or not silicon prices will fall as the industry matures. While they all think margins will narrow, they disagree on whether there will be an industry wide shakeout, or if the polysilicon and silicon wafer markets will move up and down separately. Panelists include Suvi Sharma, CEO of Solaria, and Peter Nieh, managing director of Lightspeed Venture Partners. The moderator is David Chen, managing director of Morgan Stanley.

published December 4, 2008 by

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Steve Jurvetson: Green nano solutions

At the AlwaysOn GoingGreen conference in Sausalito, Calif., Steve Jurvetson of Draper Fisher Jurvetson describes the acceleration of computer and genetic technology through Moore's law, and then outlines nature-inspired methods for building nanotech. He also explains why decoding DNA from the ocean is important to green tech's future.

published September 18, 2008 by

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Moore's Law to last 40 more years?

At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, Intel's Justin Rattner and Michael Garner talk about materials and processes that will be used in the next 40 years to increase chip performance and advance production. Rattner and Garner discuss the future use of CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology and carbon-based devices such as carbon nanotubes.

published August 21, 2008 by

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Intel touts Moorestown 'mobile' chip

At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, Anand Chandrasekher, general manager for the chipmaker's Ultra Mobility Group, shows a wafer with "Lincroft"--the main processor for Moorestown. The new integrated chip, designed for the smartphone market, is expected before the 2009-2010 time frame, according to Chandrasekher.

published August 20, 2008 by

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Intel demos quad-core notebooks

Intel's David Perlmutter showed the company's new quad-core laptop computers at the Intel Developer Conference in San Francisco. He demonstrated how video conferencing can be done in HD--even with other applications running in the background--without sacrificing power and performance.

published August 20, 2008 by

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Inside the Intel Developer Forum

ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das talks with senior editor Sam Diaz about trends and products at this year's Intel Developer Forum. Diaz discusses how the chipmaker's latest processors pave the way for innovations that cut across industries. He also explains why Intel's ever-faithful support of WiMax may finally begin reaping benefits.

published August 19, 2008 by

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The Green Enterprise: Intel

On the next installment of The Green Enterprise, CNET News.com's Michael Kanellos looks at how Intel is developing green technologies for its customers and within its own organization. Innovations include ultra-lower power 45nm chips, greening its fab operations in China, Arizona and Israel; and developing non-toxic materials for packaging and designing its chips. Kanellos also sits down with Lorie Wigle, Intel's eco-tech program office general manager and discusses the chipmaker's sustainability strategy and her views on reducing power inside the datacenter.

published May 12, 2008 by

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Apple introduces ultrathin notebook

At Macworld 2008 in San Francisco Tuesday, Apple CEO Steve Jobs shows off the company's new ultraportable notebook, the MacBook Air. The new notebook is .76 inch thick and runs on Intel's Core 2 Duo with both 1.6GHz and 1.8GHz options. Other specs include a full-size keyboard, a built-in iSight camera, and a trackpad that supports multitouch gestures.

published January 15, 2008 by

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Keeping Moore's Law alive

At Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco, Intel CEO Paul Otellini talks about keeping pace with Moore's Law by developing processor technologies that minimize power usage and allow chips to be made smaller.

published November 13, 2007 by

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