Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can securely reach him on Signal and WhatsApp at 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

The key to lowering transaction costs

The key to lowering transaction costs

During a panel discussion about distributed business at SuperNova 2005, Philip Evans of the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and author of "Blown to Bits: How the New Economics of Information Transforms Strategy," offered up some basic principles for business success, which he defined primarily as lowering transaction costs.

June 22, 2005 by in Networking

HP ships oddly positioned AMD64 notebook in the name of "choice"

HP ships oddly positioned AMD64 notebook in the name of "choice"

If there ever was a case study for the uphill battle that AMD must face to get its chips into the marketplace (64-bit or not), today's announcement of the $999 Turion 64-based nx6125 notebook computer by HP is probably it.  The Turion is AMD's most power-aware and conservative mobile chip to date that includes the AMD64 technology -- a 32-bit/64-bit hybrid architecture that supports traditional 32-bit applications as well as ones written to take advantage of AMD's 64-bit extensions.

June 22, 2005 by in Hardware

Memory firewall to the rescue

Memory firewall to the rescue

Last month I met with Nand Mulchandani and Charles Renert of Determina, which has developed unique security software that the company claims stops all memory-based attacks--such as stack and heap overflows, format string vulnerabilities and shatter attacks. Given that every critical server vulnerability in the last few years has been memory-based and about 60 percent of Windows vulnerabilities as well, Determina has tapped into the major root of the cybersecurity problem.

June 21, 2005 by in Security

Schwartz: Blogs are essential for leadership

Schwartz: Blogs are essential for leadership

During an interview with Supernova 2005 conference host Kevin Werbach, Sun President, COO and chief blogger Jonathan Schwartz called blogging essential for leadership. "If you want to be a leader, I can't see surviving without a blog.

June 21, 2005 by in Telcos

Does Microsoft know what IT shops really need?

Does Microsoft know what IT shops really need?

David Berlind's Feature heap won't undo LAMP's toll on Microsoft brings to mind the importance of understanding the client's needs. The Microsoft juggernaut came about, in large part, because Bill Gates envisioned a one-stop-shopping model by which the consumer could go to one vendor and buy one product (a PC configured with Windows and Office) and meet 95% of the their needs.

June 21, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

How to pick a BlackBerry

How to pick a BlackBerry

I'm beginning to notice more and more BlackBerry 7100s showing up in the hands of mobile warriors.  For example, by carrying the latest and greatest, I was always on the leading edge compared to the rest of the family, often drawing those coveted oohs and aahs.

June 20, 2005 by in Mobility

Microsoft XML technologies and patents drawing fire from multiple quarters

Microsoft XML technologies and patents drawing fire from multiple quarters

The recently announced XML-based file formats for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint -- formats that Microsoft has claimed to be "open" -- are getting some heat for not only pushing the boundaries on the definition of open, but also for the validity of the patents behind them.   In addition, the patents behind other Microsoft XML technologies are under heavy scrutiny as well.

June 20, 2005 by in Legal

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