Lucy Sherriff

freelance blogger/journalist

<p>Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are. </p>

Latest from Lucy Sherriff

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Photonic triplets hint at quantum comms three-way

Photonic triplets hint at quantum comms three-way

An international team of scientists have succeeded in splitting a single photon into three, beating some seriously long odd in the process. The work could pave the way for three-way quantum communications and according to lead researcher, Associate Professor Thomas Jennewein will "open a new frontier of quantum optics and allow a new class of experiments in quantum computing using photons.

July 30, 2010 by in Innovation

Scientists hear 'white graphene' bell toll for silicon circuits

Scientists hear 'white graphene' bell toll for silicon circuits

Researchers at Rice University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science have successfully created single-atom sheets of an insulator: hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN).The breakthrough could help graphene kick silicon back into the 20th century, paving the way for nanoscale field-effect transistors, quantum capacitors or biosensors.

July 30, 2010 by in Innovation

Spintronics boosted by efficient pumping technique

Spintronics boosted by efficient pumping technique

Researchers at Tohoku University on Japan and Delft University of Technology and Science in The Netherlands have experimentally demonstrated “an unprecedented level of control” of pumping electron spins, according to an article published in the 23 May edition of the APS journal Physics Review Letters.

May 24, 2011 by in Innovation

Floral defects could help graphene bend and flex

Floral defects could help graphene bend and flex

A flower-like defect in graphene, detailed in a newly published paper, could give scientists more control over the properties of graphene, potentially making sheets of the material more flexible and resistant to tearing.Researchers in the US have described seven defects which could occur naturally in graphene, or under the right conditions, could be induced in the material.

May 26, 2011 by in Innovation

Quantum switch keeps photons tangled in fibre

Quantum switch keeps photons tangled in fibre

Researchers at Northwestern University have built a switch that can route qubits, paving the way for quantum networking, and maybe one day (per Wired) a quantum internet.The all-optical switch is capable of routing entangled photons along standard, telecom grade fibre-optic cables, without the entanglement breaking down.

March 14, 2011 by in Innovation

Antennae signal new qubit architecture

Antennae signal new qubit architecture

Quantum computing may be only just out of the realms of science fiction, but already there is an issue for a standards body to address. Researchers in Austria have come up with a totally new architecture for the exchange of quantum information: quantum antennae.

February 28, 2011 by in Innovation