Lucy Sherriff

freelance blogger/journalist

<p>Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are. </p>

Latest from Lucy Sherriff

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Photonic triplets hint at quantum comms three-way

Photonic triplets hint at quantum comms three-way

An international team of scientists have succeeded in splitting a single photon into three, beating some seriously long odd in the process. The work could pave the way for three-way quantum communications and according to lead researcher, Associate Professor Thomas Jennewein will "open a new frontier of quantum optics and allow a new class of experiments in quantum computing using photons.

July 30, 2010 by in Innovation

Scientists hear 'white graphene' bell toll for silicon circuits

Scientists hear 'white graphene' bell toll for silicon circuits

Researchers at Rice University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science have successfully created single-atom sheets of an insulator: hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN).The breakthrough could help graphene kick silicon back into the 20th century, paving the way for nanoscale field-effect transistors, quantum capacitors or biosensors.

July 30, 2010 by in Innovation

Transistors? Pah. IBM demos complete graphene circuit

Transistors? Pah. IBM demos complete graphene circuit

IBM, having wowed us all in April with graphene transistors that run at 155GHz, has gone one step further and now reports success in building a high-speed, graphene-based circuit.The researchers, writing in the June 10 issue of Science, describe how they deposited multiple layers of graphene on a silicon wafer.

June 9, 2011 by in Innovation

Graphene: stackable when wet

Graphene: stackable when wet

A quick one to add to the list of fun facts about graphene: if you want to stack it in layers to make a supercapacitor, you’d do well to keep it wet. This fun fact has been brought to our attention by the good people of Monash University in Australia.

July 8, 2011 by in Innovation

Lasers could illuminate band gap for graphene

Lasers could illuminate band gap for graphene

Graphene: famous for being a Nobel Prize prompting wonder material, and for having no band gap. The lack of band gap means graphene’s future as a possible replacement for silicon has always looked bleak, because a band gap is the property that allows a transistor to be switched on and off.

June 20, 2011 by in Innovation

Bristol University demos brightest quantum optics

Bristol University demos brightest quantum optics

University of Bristol researchers, in collaboration with colleagues at the Universities of Osaka and Hokkaido in Japan, have demonstrated a quantum logic gate - a controlled-NOT or CNOT gate - that was first proposed a decade ago.Back in 2001, this four-photon design opened up the possibility of optical quantum computing.

June 26, 2011 by in Innovation