Dana Gardner

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Dana Gardner is president and principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions, an enterprise IT analysis, market research, and consulting firm. Gardner, a leading identifier of software and cloud productivity trends and new IT business growth opportunities, honed his skills and refined his insights as an industry analyst, pundit, and news editor covering the emerging software development and enterprise infrastructure arenas for the last 18 years.Gardner tracks and analyzes a critical set of enterprise software technologies and business development issues: Cloud computing, SOA, business process management, business intelligence, next-generation data centers, and application lifecycle optimization. His specific interests include Enterprise 2.0 and social media, cloud standards and security, as well as integrated marketing technologies and techniques.Gardner is a former senior analyst at Yankee Group and Aberdeen Group, and a former editor-at-large and founding online news editor at InfoWorld. He is a former news editor at IDG News Service, Digital News & Review, and Design News.

Dana Gardner is president and principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions, LLC, a New Hampshire-based IT analysis and new media content production and consultancy firm that he founded in 2005. He produces a series of podcast/videocast/transcript/blog content shows, called BriefingsDirect[tm/sm], some of which are sponsored and which he blogs on. Such sponsored shows are declared individually as such and by what organization or company. When Dana blogs on ZDNet on companies that he does have, or has had, consulting and/or sponsorship relationships, he declares that in each blog entry. There is no connection between the negotiation of such sponsorships and the opinions expressed by Dana here on ZDNet. The following organizations/companies are active sponsors, or have consulting relationships with Dana: Ariba/SAP, Akamai Technologies, BMC Software, Dell Software, Embarcadero Technologies, GigaOM Research, Hewlett-Packard, Kapow Software, The Open Group, VMware, and Workday. As a matter of CNET Networks and Interarbor Solutions policies, when Dana covers an organization that is also a sponsor of a BriefingsDirect-produced podcast, videocast or any other content, a disclosure will be included with the coverage. Updated (4/11/2013): Instead of providing a disclosure on just those editorials (blog posts, etc.) that intersect the above listed companies, we have changed the policy to include a link to this full disclosure at the end of every one of Dana's blog posts. In the case of audio or video-based coverage, such disclosures will be provided within the editorial content itself.

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Oracle's Fusion Apps finally come out from behind the OpenWorld curtain

Oracle's Fusion Apps finally come out from behind the OpenWorld curtain

While ERP emerged with and was designed for client/server architectures, Fusion has emerged with a full Java EE and SOA architecture; it is built around Oracle Fusion middleware 11g and uses Oracle BPEL Process Manager to run processes as orchestrations of processes exposed from the Fusion Apps or other legacy applications. That makes the architecture of Fusion Apps clean and flexible.

October 15, 2009 by in Oracle

From OpenWorld, Oracle and HP align forces to modernize legacy apps and spur IT transformation

From OpenWorld, Oracle and HP align forces to modernize legacy apps and spur IT transformation

Oracle and HP are providing products and services that holistically support the many required variables to successfully implement IT transformation. HP hardware and storage systems have been tuned to support Oracle databases, applications and software infrastructure for many years, and the partnership continues to expand in the age of SOA, legacy modernization, and cloud computing.

September 24, 2008 by in Oracle

Oracle users enjoy open source benefits but shy away from databases -- for now

Oracle users enjoy open source benefits but shy away from databases -- for now

I agree with Tony that open source databases are ripe for rapid growth and expand use-case scenarios. As more applications are served up as services, those service providers will be doing a lot of custom distributed infrastructure development, leveraging open source, and rolling their own functionally targeted stacks. Think of Google, Amazon, eBay and Yahoo as examples. Are they running Oracle or DB2 or Microsoft SQL Server, or are they taking a more commoditized view on databases?

October 24, 2007 by in Oracle

Sun's courting of start-ups discloses a new quandary -- it needs to compete with its core market

Sun's courting of start-ups discloses a new quandary -- it needs to compete with its core market

In the mashup and SOA worlds, frankly, Sun's defined value (high performance at low cost) grows, but it's addressable market actually shrinks. Because there will be a handful or mega-service providers, who will necessarily mostly customize their infrastructure to tune it to specific apps and transactional functions. And that is not a Java Enterprise Suite, and it won't be off-the-shelf software at all -- but it will be off-the-shelf hardware.

March 21, 2007 by in Oracle

Oracle cozies up to Spring developers by making EJB runtime open source under Eclipse

Oracle cozies up to Spring developers by making EJB runtime open source under Eclipse

While Oracle says they have no qualms about the Glassfish experience, it seems to me that this is an indication of a defection. If Java and Glassfish are not allowing developers to access what they need of open source technology with ease, and if Oracle is now a top-tier member of Eclipse (as it has now become), then the role and influence of Java -- as a technology set and community -- must be fast waning.

March 6, 2007 by in Oracle

Oracle and Hyperion combo moves them closer to the ultimate business dashboard

Oracle and Hyperion combo moves them closer to the ultimate business dashboard

Oracle and Hyperion both needed to move toward such a full-suite benefit, hence the strong fit together. There are sales and channel overlaps, but not significant product overlaps, which should lead to consolidation benefits for the companies. And the merger will bring the Oracle and Hyperion product lines added reach through their non-overlapping accounts and channels. One also has to wonder how well Hyperion's features and functions will mesh with (mash up?) Oracle's burgeoning variety of business applications.

February 28, 2007 by in Oracle