Could Boot Camp be a bad thing for Apple?

Apple's annual report, filed last Thursday, shows that the company is worried that Boot Camp could lead to fewer Mac apps, which in turn could mean fewer sales.

Apple's annual report, filed last Thursday, shows that the company is worried that Boot Camp could lead to fewer Mac apps, which in turn could mean fewer sales.

Could Boot Camp be a bad thing for Apple?
In the report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Apple describes how Boot Camp could be detrimental to sales:

"The company believes decisions by customers to purchase the company's hardware products are often based on the availability of third-party application software."

The thinking goes like this.  Apple now ships with Boot Camp, this allows users to run Windows, so instead of porting apps to the Mac OS developers are going to tell users to buy a copy of Windows instead.  If you have to buy Windows as well as a Mac, why not just by a Windows-based PC.

About half of the Macs currently in use are equipped with an Intel processor, the rest, which run on PowerPC processors, can't make use of Boot Camp.  How many Intel-based Mac users actually use Boot Camp is unknown.

I'm not sure how this is going to play out because Boot Camp is a double-edged sword.  On the one hand it's a handy safety net for Windows users wanting to migrate to the Mac, but if user migrate and find that they're spending most of their time in Windows there's a chance that they might not be so willing to buy another Mac when it comes time to upgrade.  Also, there are the hassles associated with hand-holding two operating systems.  As for developers not bothering to write software for the Mac OS, with the Mac market share growing daily at present, I don't see companies overlooking Mac users.

If Apple is worried that developers won't bother writing apps for the Mac then the company needs to do more to foster the development community and encourage development. 

Thoughts?

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