Here are 8 who should worry about video iTunes

Yesterday's announcement by Apple of a video-capable iPod is exciting. But not as transformative as the parallel announcement of iTunes6, with the day-after-airing availability of critically acclaimed, hit ABC-TV shows such as "Desperate Housewives" and "Lost" for just $1.

Yesterday's announcement by Apple of a video-capable iPod is exciting. But not as transformative as the parallel announcement of iTunes6, with the day-after-airing availability of critically acclaimed, hit ABC-TV shows such as "Desperate Housewives" and "Lost" for just $1.99 an eppy. That, and a whole bunch of short films from Pixar Animation Studios.

Well, given that Apple CEO Steve Jobs also runs Pixar, that's not too big a surprise. But as to the ABC shows, well, I can think of a whole host of companies aind industry sectors that are figuring out "how do we deal with this" counterstrategies right now.

Here who has cause to worry:

  • Rival broadcast and cable networks, trying to figure out if the Digital Rights Management schemes used by Apple are airtight enough to attempt similar distribution channels;
  • Rival television studios, attempting to craft renumeration scenarios for providing this content;
  • Rival film studios, who are also considering distribution options;
  • Movie theater owners, who somewhat justifiably suspect that this new capability is just a baby-step in the inevitable move toward full-feature distribution - and in a shorter release window that would affect box office sales;
  • DVD video retailers, who would obviously be concerned about the form-factor competition as well as the lower price point in this new video content distribution channel;
  • Microsoft and RealNetworks, whose streaming video platforms - and streaming video alliances with content providers might be threatened by this new offering. Full-motion high res video  available the morning after a show airs will take eyeballs away from Real's subscription-based streaming video content;
  • TiVo, which might surely lose "Desperate Housewives" and "Lost" taping sessions (and the loss of advertising impressions) to ITunes;
  • Rival portable media players, who will feel the urgent need to strike up alliances of their own with programmers.

That's just for starters.

Can you think of more companies or industry sectors who have cause to worry? Post a TalkBack and let me know!