IBM rolls out upgrade to DB2

The database wars are waging on, as IBM rolled out an updated version of its DB2 Universal Database. The new version, due to ship on June 8, will run across a variety of operating systems, including Linux, Windows, AIX and OS/2.

The database wars are waging on, as IBM on Tuesday rolled out an updated version of its DB2 Universal Database, version 7.2.

The new version, due to ship on June 8, will run across a variety of operating systems, including Linux, Windows, AIX and OS/2.

Just about all of the 7.2 enhancements are aimed at providing tighter integration between DB2 and other IBM or rival products.

NO "Fifty percent of the 7.2 upgrades were requested by our core ISVs (independent software vendors) and customers," said Paul Rivot, director of database servers and transaction processing for IBM's Software Group.

Web services key
Among the 7.2 upgrades are tighter integration between DB2 and IBM's WebSphere Application Server, as well as IBM's MQSeries message-queuing middleware. As WebSphere includes support for Web services protocols, such as SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and UDDI (Universal Description Discovery and Integration), IBM is touting DB2's Web services integration features.

IBM's two main database competitors, Oracle Corp. and Microsoft Corp., also are forging tighter links between their respective databases and various middleware products. Oracle is designing its Oracle 9i database to be tightly integrated with its 9i Application Server. On June 14, Oracle is slated to unveil the 9i database.

DB2 7.2 includes extensions to the database's data joiner technology, allowing DB2 customers more access to information stored in other databases from Oracle, Microsoft and Sybase Inc., according to IBM. Data warehousing connectors that more tightly link DB2 to SAP, i2 and other B2B applications also are bundled into 7.2, Rivot said.

At the same time, IBM also is adding to DB2 7.2 new connectors designed to allow data sharing between IBM's Life Sciences biotechnology applications and DB2.

Rivot said IBM is expecting to offer between 20 and 30 such Life Sciences connectors. And the company will likely provide connectors for other IBM and non-IBM vertical applications in the future, Rivot added.

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