/>
X

Parts delay hurts MacBook owners

Apple parts delay hurts MacBook owners
munir-kotadia.jpg
Written by Munir Kotadia on

Apple has admitted problems getting hold of enough replacement parts to repair faulty MacBooks that have been randomly shutting down.

Many owners of Apple's MacBook, which was launched in May, subsequently complained about the computer randomly shutting down after a couple of months use. The issue was caused by faulty logic boards (motherboards), problematic heat-sinks or a combination of both.

Some Australian customers have complained about their MacBook being out of action for over a month while Apple's service centre waited for spare parts. Apple initially denied there was a problem but this morning a spokesperson admitted there was an issue but claimed it had now been resolved.

"In terms of the logic board we have now got supply -- they were shipping yesterday ... apparently there was a bit of an issue but that has all been resolved and everybody has everything they need," the spokesperson told ZDNet Australia.

The MacBook replaced Apple's iBook and is the lower-end version of the company's MacBook Pro, which was released at the start of the year and has had its fair share of problems. Since its launch, the MacBook has been incredibly popular and attracted many people that had never previously owned a Mac.

One customer affected by the delays is Deborah Baker, a Sydney-based sales rep for a large motor manufacturing company. Baker bought a white MacBook on 14 July, which worked perfectly for almost two months. On 7 September, she handed her MacBook to the Broadway service centre in Sydney because the machine had started randomly shutting down. At the time she was told it would take two and a half weeks to repair.

As Baker used the machine every day for work, she was disappointed and surprised that repairs -- for a known fault -- would take so long to fix.

Three weeks after the system was handed in, she still hadn't heard back and decided to call the repair centre -- only to be told that the MacBook still wasn't ready because there was a shortage of parts.

After another week and numerous calls to the Broadway service centre and to Apple's main customer relations number, Baker was told that "every [Apple] service department in Australia is waiting for replacement parts".

This morning, Baker called the service centre again only to be given the same story -- the parts have not yet arrived, they are expecting them to arrive today and she should call back tomorrow.

Having never purchased an Apple product in the past, Baker said she is now "disillusioned" and unsure if she would buy another product made by Apple.

When Baker's case was put to Apple, the spokesperson said: "That is a concern -- it shouldn't have happened. I would love to find out who that person is and get that situation resolved".

With Baker's permission, ZDNet Australia has passed on her details to Apple.

Related

How to spot a deepfake? One simple trick is all you need
facial-recognition

How to spot a deepfake? One simple trick is all you need

AI & Robotics
Malcolm Gladwell says working from home is 'not in your best interests'. The reality is much more complicated
malcolm-gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell says working from home is 'not in your best interests'. The reality is much more complicated

Productivity
We wanted to make things worse, says McDonald's, but it costs too much money
screen-shot-2022-07-27-at-4-14-42-pm.png

We wanted to make things worse, says McDonald's, but it costs too much money

Business