Pinterest hires Apple design alum as creative lead

After Apple, Kare eventually founded her own agency, Susan Kare Design, which went on to produce some familiar prints, such as Microsoft's Solitaire cards and Facebook's virtual gifts.

It's a busy week for Pinterest's HR department.

The social media darling announced on Friday it has hired tech industry veteran and creative professional Susan Kare as a product design lead.

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The San Francisco-based startup eagerly highlighted Kare's portfolio of work from Apple, describing her as "the pioneer behind iconic designs like the original Macintosh icons Lasso, the Grabber, and the Paint Bucket, and the first typefaces like Chicago," which was used on the first four generations of the iPod.

Kare demonstrated loyalty to Apple co-founder Steve Jobs by following him to his now-defunct software company NeXt, where as creative director she became the 10th employee.

Kare eventually founded her own agency, Susan Kare Design, which went on to produce some familiar prints, such as Microsoft's Solitaire cards and Facebook's virtual gifts.

At Pinterest -- where she actually started officially earlier this week -- Kare will be one of the Creative team leads responsible for the digital scrapbooking platform's interface. That will include designs around Pinterest's budding e-commerce venture Buyable Pins as well as search and other app features.

Kare is reporting to Pinterest's head of product design (and also Apple veteran) Bob Baxley.

On Thursday, Pinterest made a different kind of innovative move for the industry by publishing its hiring goals for 2016 to boost diversity for women and minorities, especially in engineering roles.

The private company hopes to boost hiring rates for full-time engineers to at least 30 percent female and eight percent from underrepresented ethnic backgrounds. Pinterest also wants to grow hiring rates for non-engineering roles to 12 percent underrepresented ethnic backgrounds.

Image via Pinterest