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Secunia: Less than 2% of Windows PCs fully patched

It's long been established that the unpatched state of the Windows monoculture is the reason we are facing a malware epidemic.Yet, the latest vulnerability patching statistics from Secunia's PSI (Personal Software Inspector) is a major eye-opener for everyone tracking the security of the Windows ecosystem.
Written by Ryan Naraine, Contributor on
An unpatched (Windows) monoculture
It's long been established that the unpatched state of the Windows monoculture is the reason we are facing a malware epidemic.

Yet, the latest vulnerability patching statistics from Secunia's PSI (Personal Software Inspector) is a major eye-opener for everyone tracking the security of the Windows ecosystem.  According to data culled from 20,000 users of the free software inspector, about 98% of all installed/detected applications are vulnerable to a known security flaw.

These stats confirm a scary reality and, when you compare them with information released by Secunia last May (when the unpatched count stood at 28%), you get a real sense of just how easy it is for malware writers to hit wide open targets.

The total number of PCs/users included in these numbers are 20,000, out of these 98.09% have 1 or more insecure programs installed on their PC, hence: 98 out of 100 PCs that are connected to the Internet have insecure programs installed!

[ SEE: Ten free security utilities you should already be using ]

Secunia defines an "insecure program" as a piece of software for which there is a newer version of the program available from the vendor that corrects one or more vulnerabilities, but the user have yet to install the secure version.

From Secunia's blog:

  • No insecure programs:  1.91% of Windows machines
  • 1-5 insecure programs:  30.27% of PCs
  • 6-10 insecure programs: 25.07% of PCs
  • 11+ insecure programs: 45.76% of PCs

[ SEE: Secunia launches pay-as-you-go exploit shop ]

The company did not identify the applications on the list of "insecure programs" but it's a safe bet it involves the most widely deployed software programs like Adobe Acrobat/Reader, Adobe Flash, RealNetworks' RealPlayer, WinZip, QuickTime and Web browsers.

* Image source: Maggiejumps' Flickr photostream (Creative Commons 2.0)

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