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Summer 2006: What's hot, what's not in SOA

Jeff Schneider with this year's hot-and-not SOA list.
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Written by Joe McKendrick, Contributor on

It's 100-plus degrees here in the Northeast today, so I was immediately drawn to Jeff Schneider's recent posting on what he sees as "hot" and "what's not" in the world of SOA these days.

Jeff notes the following trends:

Hot: Business-driven SOA
Not: IT doing SOA without business alignment

Hot: Creating a strategy and plan to take advantage of SOA
Not: Debating the definition of SOA

Hot: Implementing standards based, federated mediation tools
Not: Implementing proprietary mediation tools

Hot: Web 2.0 as SOA composition strategy
Not: Web 2.0 as a means to create community
 
Hot: Doing SOA
Not: Blogging about SOA [Say it's not so, Jeff!]

Inspired, I have added a few of my own to add to the list:

Hot: Large vendors buying up specialized SOA vendors
Not: Large vendors creating their own SOA solutions

Hot: Open-source stack
Not: Paying retail for software

Hot: Software as a Service
Not: Software without service 

Hot: Customized applications
Not: Packaged applications 

Hot: Legacy integration
Not: Reinventing the wheel

Hot: ESBs
Not: ESBs

Hot: WS-Security
Not: WS-AnythingElseThatComplicatesOurLives

Hot: Speculation about the pairing of business process management and SOA
Not: Brad and Angelina -- who the heck cares?

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