The real reason why SBC won't work with Vonage on E-911

I am not surprised that SBC is declining to work with Vonage on a way to allow Vonage subscribers access to theE-911 emergency network.SBC's public reason for not being all thateager to do so is that well, Vonage hasn't figured out all the tech stuff on their end and we, SBC, don't have time to help them with it.

I am not surprised that SBC is declining to work with Vonage on a way to allow Vonage subscribers access to theE-911 emergency network.

SBC's public reason for not being all thateager to do so is that well, Vonage hasn't figured out all the tech stuff on their end and we, SBC, don't have time to help them with it. Or, as the giant ILEC recently told the FCC, "SBC can not agree to engage in numerous individual tests with each and every VoIP provider."

But why then, are Verizon and BellSouth cooperating with Vonage on a way to make 911 access work?

First of all,the "it would be a pain in the neck" issue doesn't hold water with me. Since most VoIP service providers use similar equipment,getting in the lab with Vonage could result in a template forE-911 solutions that could be deployed by many, if not most, of the 400 or so VoIP access companies in the U.S.

It seems to me the real issue is that SBC sees Vonage as a rival to be feared. Out of strong competitive and self-preservation instincts, has a type of ingrained (if unstated) opposition to helping companies come to solutions that would, in the end drain away part of their customer base for advanced telecom services such as VoIP.

But what might be aggressive competitive policy is not responsible social policy. Which is why Vonage may go to Congress and the FCC to force SBC to work with them.

Do you agree with me, or am I just too jaded today? Post a TalkBack and let me know what you think.