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Transfer data at 1,000 times the current speed?

Can you imagine data transfers at 1,000 times the current speed? Singapore's Cellonics Incorporated Pte Ltd claims to have discovered the way to encode digital signals in various (communications) channels in a simpler, faster and cheaper fashion.

SINGAPORE--Can you imagine data transfers at 1,000 times the current speed?

Singapore's Cellonics Incorporated Pte Ltd claims to have discovered just that. How? By encoding digital signals in various (communications) channels in a simpler, faster and cheaper fashion.

The technology itself--also called Cellonics for CELL electrONICS--promises to be a new way of encoding and decoding information at a higher rate than the norm.

"In a conventional method (of encoding and decoding information), a device has to capture 1,000 wave cycles...with our technology, a communications device only needs to capture one cycle to complete the same process," Cellonics co-founder Lye Kin Mun said.

"Thus, the transfer of information is improved literally by 1,000 times," Lye claimed.

"The technology is implemented into any modulator demodulator of any communication device...both wired and wireless," he said.

The company claimed that the technology is based on research in the studies of how biological cells react when stimulated. The mathematical formulations to simulate such cell response require use of non-linear dynamical systems (NDS).

NDS theory is used in Chaos studies to predict future events like weather forecast and population growth. According to Lye, its technology is based on NDS and as such offers a platform for electrical signals to transmit in a more efficient manner.

"The fastest wireless LAN transfer occurs at about 11Mbps. Our technology can do it at approximately 27Mbps," Lye claimed.

Established in January 2000, the company is a spin off from the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Center for Wireless Communications and Computational Science Department.

Cellonics was founded by Lye, Jurianto Joe, Lye Hoeng Fai and mathematician Chow Shui Nee.

The company claims to have filed 13 patents worldwide and is expected to submit three more patents in the next two weeks, said Cellonics CEO Lye Hoeng Fai.

With Cellonics' announcement of its technology at CommunicAsia 2001, the company will roll out a technology evaluation license for US$200,000. This includes the transfer of know-how, technical papers, patent applications (including unpublished works), evaluation kit, engineering notes and 35 man-hours of technical support.

The commercial license will be based on an upfront fee which will be determined on a case-by-case basis based on the requirements of the licensee, the company said.

Organized by Singapore Exhibition Services Pte Ltd, CommunicAsia 2001--one of Asia's premier telecommunications and IT events--runs from June 19 to 22 at the Singapore Expo.