Uncover policy info with GPRESULT.EXE

Microsoft introduced a handy tool for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 called the Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP) that enables Windows users and administrators to, among other things, determine which policies have been applied to the computer.

Windows 2000 Professional
Uncover policy info with GPRESULT.EXE

Microsoft introduced a handy tool for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 called the Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP) that enables Windows users and administrators to, among other things, determine which policies have been applied to the computer.

This capability is extremely handy when you're trying to troubleshoot a problem with local or group policy.

The RSoP snap-in for Windows XP won't work on Windows 2000 computers, but the Windows 2000 Resource Kit does include a tool that gives Windows 2000 users at least some of the same capabilities.

The Group Policy Results tool (GPRESULT.EXE) displays the results of group policy for the current user and computer. Used without switches, the GPRESULT command lists general information about the user and computer including domain name, domain type, profile information, and security group membership. It also shows the date and time of the last group policy application, from where the policies were applied, and general information about what policies were applied.

Here's a list of some of the switches you can use with the GPRESULT command:

  • /v switch: use to run GPRESULT.EXE in verbose mode.
  • /s switch: use to run GPRESULT.EXE in super-verbose mode.
  • /c switch: use to view only computer policy.
  • /u switch: use to view only user policy.

For help with the syntax of the command, enter GPRESULT /? at a command prompt.

Windows 2000 Server


Find Help files for uninstalled components

All of the services included with Windows 2000 Server feature Help content. Microsoft includes this content to help users understand how the service works and to learn how to configure it.

However, sometimes you might need to find information about a topic on a server that doesn't have the service installed. Or, you might be considering installing a service on the server, but you need to get more information before making up your mind.

Did you know that Windows setup installs Help files for services during Windows 2000 Server installation even when it hasn't installed the service itself or the service is available? While you can always browse the \%systemroot%\Help folder for the Help file you're looking for, there's an easier way to locate the Help files for some of the most common services.

Follow these steps:

  1. On the server, go to Start | Programs | Administrative Tools, and open the Configure Your Server applet.
  2. In the left pane, select the service for which you want help.
  3. In the right pane, click the Learn More link.

This process opens the Help file for the target service without installing or enabling the service.