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Verizon announces it will debut a 4G handset by mid-2011

Verizon Wireless has announced that they will issue their first LTE handset for the 4G network by the middle of 2011. But with the good news, there's a bit of bad news: unlimited data plans will probably be eliminated.
Written by Rachel King, Contributor on
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Verizon Wireless has announced that they will issue their first LTE handset for the 4G network by the middle of 2011. But with the good news, there's a bit of bad news: unlimited data plans will probably be eliminated.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Verizon's CTO Anthony Melone said that the 4G network will launch first, before the end of this year. Then, Verizon will roll out LTE phones about three to six months later. The handhelds will include dual chipsets for compatibility with already-existing networks as it will take awhile to blanket the nation with full 4G coverage.

But equally as interesting, Melone notes that plans with "as much data as you can consume is the big issue that has to change." That sounds pretty serious, which probably means they're already in the process of devising new plans with data usage allotments. And Verizon is not alone in suffering from too much traffic on their data networks.

Personally, I can't imagine not having an unlimited data plan after having one for so long. But I'm definitely one of those iPhone user addicts who should probably enroll in some type of rehab program for spending far too much time on my smartphone.

But if Verizon chooses to eliminate unlimited data plans, do you think other wireless providers will follow?

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