What slows Linux most?

Patching is far more complex in the Linux world than in Windows, because systems and what they run are far more diverse. But it's worth someone's business plan.

penguins

Paul Murphy asks a good question today. What's the key factor slowing adoption of Linux?

His answer: experts who don't know anything. He offers two examples, one a bad install by a Windows person, the other an inefficient Internet manager.

Below these examples, however, are deeper problems, problems we've addressed here. A clean install that includes applications, like the one Novell has been working on, would fix his first problem. A manager with a technical Clue might fix his second problem.

Last week, I described patch management as a big problem for Linux' adoption, and suggested there might be a business opportunity there. Patching is far more complex in the Linux world than in Windows, because systems and what they run are far more diverse. But it's worth someone's business plan, because the resulting service is something you can legitimately charge for, even under the GPL.

Licensing is another problem. In addition to the FUD offered by Microsoft and others about the complexity of commercial open source licensing, and the "viral" nature of the GPL, there is also a lot of real complexity, many of it driven by the same vendors, and their multiple variants of the BSD license..

You, however, must have your own ideas, some of which are better than those Paul or I have offered. What are they?