Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Natalie Gagliordi

Natalie Gagliordi is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Louisville, Kentucky, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously worked as the editor of Kiosk Marketplace, an online B2B trade publication that focused on interactive self-service technology, while also contributing to additional websites that covered retail technology, digital signage hardware and mobile payment trends. Natalie attended George Washington University, where she studied communication sciences, and also the University of South Florida, where she received a B.A. in News-Editorial Journalism.

Latest Posts

SQL Server 2005: a 3-tier purist's nightmare

SQL Server 2005: a 3-tier purist's nightmare

SQL Server 2005, now available as a "community technology preview,"  is an odd beast.  For those who believe their databases should be little more than simple data access routines with business logic placed at the "middle tier," the move towards application server technology integrated as part of a database is a Bad Thing.

April 20, 2005 by in Data Management

Buy, sell or hold: The outlook for technology stocks

Buy, sell or hold: The outlook for technology stocks

Last week I went to the Churchill Club panel discussion, "Buy, Sell or Hold: The Outlook for Technology Stocks," at Ricky's Hyatt in Palo Alto. The A-list tech investor panelists were Matt L’Heureux of Goldman Sachs, Roger McNamee of Integral Capital Partners and Michael Murphy of Murphy Investment Management.

April 19, 2005 by in Banking

New life emerging for Moore's Law

New life emerging for Moore's Law

 Imprint lithography--along with silicon nanowires, phase change memory, spintronics optoelectronics, and 3D chips--is among the many emerging technologies that could extend the life of Moore's Law. During this computing principle's 40-year reign, chipmakers have steadily boosted the performance of their products while simultaneously dropping the price.

April 19, 2005 by in Innovation

The rise of the open sorcerers

The rise of the open sorcerers

Open source has become far more than a movement to democratize or free up software development and distribution from the clutches of companies producing monolithic, proprietary products. IBM and other establishment companies (sans Microsoft) have certainly joined, rather than opposed, the movement, mostly for reasons related to outflanking competitors.

April 19, 2005 by in Open Source

The end of corporate computing?

The end of corporate computing?

Nick Carr has followed up his "IT Doesn’t Matter" article (Harvard Business Review, 2003) and subsequent book, Does IT Matter? (Harvard Business School Press, 2004), this time with another clarion call for extinction of enterprise computing as we know it.

April 18, 2005 by in Hardware

The lonely crowd gets a big brother

The lonely crowd gets a big brother

A Dave Matthews Band bus driver was recently convicted of emptying a septic tank onto the open deck of a Chicago River tour boat containing 100 passengers. He didn't mean to dump it on the tour boat, by the way--he just meant to dump it in the river.

April 18, 2005 by in Tech Industry

New Siebel chief says he can do better, but when and how?

New Siebel chief says he can do better, but when and how?

Coming up on a year as CEO of the 'troubled' Siebel Systems, former IBM'er Mike Lawrie was rolled out to the press to talk about whatever milestones were achieved during his first 11 months on the job. Less than two weeks later he was unceremoniously sacked, replaced by George Shaheen, who had been a Siebel board member for a decade.

April 18, 2005 by in CXO

A new metric for economic power

A new metric for economic power

 IT Facts has details of the Cinema Index survey, comparing the cost of a movie ticket to average earnings around the world. Workers in India have the best deal, earning the price of a movie ticket in about 16 minutes.

April 18, 2005 by in Tech Industry

The view from Cisco's helm

The view from Cisco's helm

In an interview with News.com, Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers describes Cisco's ideal takeover target as a company with "about 100 people, primarily in an engineering product area, with good engineers that are just about to bring a new product out (or has just come out.

April 18, 2005 by in Cisco

Why Comcast is chasing DNS outages

Why Comcast is chasing DNS outages

If you're not a Comcast customer, you're probably blissfully unaware of the problems that Comcast customers have been experiencing the last few weeks.  If you are a Comcast customer, then like me, you've likely experienced serious downtime and you're probably wondering what's going on.

April 15, 2005 by in Networking

Measuring RSS and your Internet/Intranet effectiveness

Measuring RSS and your Internet/Intranet effectiveness

Based on a recent e-mail I received, word is starting to get out that ZDNet is running an auction on eBay that awards the winning bidder some audio advertising space in the IT Matters series of podcasts that I host.  Normally, it goes against every rule in the editorial book here at ZDNet for someone like me to be discussing one of the company's advertising initiatives, but in this case, I'm crossing the line because I think its for a very worthy cause.

April 15, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

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