Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, aka sjvn, has been writing about technology and the business of technology since CP/M-80 was the cutting edge, PC operating system; 300bps was a fast Internet connection; WordStar was the state of the art word processor; and we liked it.His work has been published in everything from highly technical publications (IEEE Computer, ACM NetWorker, Byte) to business publications (eWEEK, InformationWeek, ZDNet) to popular technology (Computer Shopper, PC Magazine, PC World) to the mainstream press (Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, BusinessWeek).

Paula Rooney

Paula Rooney has covered the software and technology industry for more than 20 years, starting with semiconductor design and mini-computer systems at EDN News and later focused on PC software companies including Microsoft, Lotus, Oracle, Red Hat, Novell and other open source and commercial software companies for CRN and PCWeek. She received a silver award from the American Society of Business Publication Editors in 2005 for her profile on Linus Torvalds and edited and co-authored "Partnering With Microsoft," a book about Microsoft's channel published by CMP Publishing in 2004. Rooney graduated from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997. In her off time, she enjoys scuba diving, sailing, sun worshipping, running, reading, surfing (the net) and hanging out with her family. She resides on the shores of Scituate, Massachusetts.

Latest Posts

Sun ups the patent ante - but not enough

Sun ups the patent ante - but not enough

Sun's anti-climactic announcement Tuesday (they could take a few lessons from Apple here) for DTrace and the OpenSolaris release contained one minor surprise -- Sun's offer of 1,600 patents for use by the open source community, or at least those who are using OpenSolaris and Sun's CDDL. While it's nice to see Sun and IBM trying to out-nice each other to prove their commitment to open source, the main problem remains: Software patents are an inherent threat to software innovation.

January 26, 2005 by in Legal

Evaluating open source Windows

Evaluating open source Windows

Yesterday I introduced speculation that programs like Firefox, Thunderbird(left), Open Officeand the Chandler project may be more of a threat to Windows than Linux. These open source Windows applications could, in time, help take share from Microsoft Office.

January 25, 2005 by in Open Source

Blogs and editorial integrity

Blogs and editorial integrity

In my last post a gentle reader (using what I can only hope is a nom de plume) pointed out that I had written moving to Windows rather than moving from Windows. One of the peculiarities of writing is that you can read and re-read something you've written and keep seeing what you meant to write rather than what you've actually written.

January 24, 2005 by in Windows

Real open source JDK?

Real open source JDK?

Weiqi Gao reports that a true open source Java Development Kit, perhaps from IBM, could come out as early as this coming week. Reports of an an open source JDK have been around for some time.

January 21, 2005 by in Open Source

Is SELinux ready?

Is SELinux ready?

Reading this ZDNet piece about upcoming releases from Novell and Red Hat, I see that Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 4 is supposed to include Security-enhanced Linux (SELinux). This is not surprising, since Red Hat has used the last two Fedora Core releases to test SELinux.

January 20, 2005 by in Open Source

Interpreting Sun's behavior

Interpreting Sun's behavior

I have to admit, I was amused at Jonathan Schwartz's latest blog entry ("Interpreting IBM's behavior") where he complains that IBM is not being supportive of Sun's attempts to gain more customers in the financial industry:But what's been really interesting is noticing who's not necessarily been so supportive of helping us drive more opportunity with our financial services customers: IBM.

January 18, 2005 by in Open Source

There must be some misunderstanding?

There must be some misunderstanding?

The CTO of Novell Canada,Ross Chevalier, has told a reporter that North America's lagging Linux share is all due to a misunderstanding. They just don't know about all the great applications that have been ported to Linux over the last few years, from trusted names likeIBM, Oracle, PeopleSoft, and SAP, he said.

January 15, 2005 by in Open Source

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