Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Charlie Osborne

Charlie Osborne is a cybersecurity journalist and photographer who writes for ZDNet and CNET from London. PGP Key: AF40821B

Catalin Cimpanu

Catalin Cimpanu is a security reporter at ZDNet, where he covers cyber-security, data breaches, hacking, and other related topics. He previously served as security reporter for Bleeping Computer and Softpedia. Catalin is based in Romania.

Jennifer Leggio

Jennifer Leggio has been in the security industry for 17 years as a marketer, advisor, and writer. Her focus is on security culture, including disclosure, community issues, equality in security, disruptive trends, and even marketing best practices. PGP Key: 3A708289 | She prefers other contact on Twitter via @mediaphyter.

Latest Posts

Vista's Windows Mail vulnerable to file-execution attack

Vista's Windows Mail vulnerable to file-execution attack

A design error in Microsoft's Windows Mail, the e-mail application bundled into Windows Vista, could expose users to remote file-execution attacks, according to a warning from security researchers.A hacker known as "Kingcope" published proof-of-concept code to show that remote code execution is possible if a user is tricked into clicking a malicious link.

March 23, 2007 by in Windows

90-day report card: Windows Vista fared better than competitors

90-day report card: Windows Vista fared better than competitors

Ninety days after the release of Microsoft's Windows Vista to business customers, the new operating system has a much better security vulnerability profile than its predecessor and several other modern workstation operating systems including Red Hat, Ubuntu, Novell and Apple products.That's according to Jeff Jones, security strategy director in Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing group.

March 22, 2007 by in Security

Xbox Live hacked, accounts stolen

Xbox Live hacked, accounts stolen

Online gaming forums are buzzing with reports that Xbox Live accounts linked to Microsoft's Windows Live ID service are being hijacked by malicious hackers. Kevin Finisterre, a security researcher at Digital Munition, raised the issue on the Full Disclosure mailing list over the weekend, calling attention to rumors that Microsoft's Bungie.

March 20, 2007 by in Microsoft

Punditry: Will Microsoft buy flaws?

Punditry: Will Microsoft buy flaws?

Last week, I wrote about hackers starting to agitate for Microsoft (and other software vendors) to start paying for information on security vulnerabilities. As a follow-up to that post, I pinged a few security research pros, asking whether they agreed it's inevitable will start buying bugs.

March 19, 2007 by in Microsoft

A Red Hat (Linux) mega patch

A Red Hat (Linux) mega patch

Here's a major security update that may have slipped under the (mainstream media) radar.The new version of RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) desktop includes fixes for a wide range of vulnerabilities, some rated "critical.

March 16, 2007 by in Security

Old Windows kernel bug comes back to bite

Old Windows kernel bug comes back to bite

On October 22, 2004, Argentine hacker Cesar Cerrudo approached Microsoft with the discovery of a Windows Kernel GDI local privilege escalation vulnerability.  At the time, Cerrudo said Redmond's security response team deemed it a "design problem" and filed it away as something "to be fixed in a future service pack.

March 12, 2007 by in Windows

Vista vulnerable to 'Sticky Keys' backdoor

Vista vulnerable to 'Sticky Keys' backdoor

From the "neat-find-department" comes word from McAfee that Windows Vista is vulnerable to a Sticky Keys backdoor that could be exploited -- under perfect circumstances -- to launch malicious executables.McAfee researcher Vinoo Thomas said the security risk, which is already well-known on Windows XP, exists because Windows Vista does not check the integrity of the Sticky Keys file (%systemroot%windowssystem32sethc.

March 12, 2007 by in Windows

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