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The calm before the Macworld Expo storm

SAN FRANCISCO -- There's a quiet, serene kind of feeling in the Fourth and Mission area of San Francisco tonight. The kind of quiet before something big happens.
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Written by Jason D. O'Grady on

The calm before the Macworld Expo storm

SAN FRANCISCO -- There's a quiet, serene kind of feeling in the Fourth and Mission area of San Francisco tonight. The kind of quiet before something big happens. It's not completely silent though.

People are buzzing about the under construction lobby of the Marriott SF. Expo badges can be seen swinging from around random pedestrian's necks. People are carrying overnight delivery boxes in every direction. Large trailers and moving vans are unloading exhibit and booth materials. Press credentials are being claimed by industry wags blessed with access to the keynote address. Anxious attendees are snapping photos of the "Something's in the air" banners inside Moscone South. Even the waitresses at Mel's Diner are buzzing about what tomorrow's Stevenote address will deliver.

So although it's quiet, there's a distinct, palatable electricity in the air. Somethings brewing. It may not be iPhone big, but it'll be something big nonetheless. My money is on a WiMax subnotebook, iTunes video rentals, Apple TV 2.0 and iPhone applications downloadable OTA. With just 16 hours to go until Jobs' keynote we'll just have to wait and see.

Bookmark The Apple Core for live blow-by-blow coverage of the keynote address tomorrow at 9 a.m. PT (12 noon ET).

The calm before the Macworld Expo storm

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