Architecture for privacy: House in Zushi

Japanese architect Takeshi Hosaka, known for his many unconventional designs, has come up with a new method for ensuring privacy with his new home.

Living in densely packed urban spaces can often lead to privacy problems. It's safe to say that more than one of us has had the experience of wondering if our neighbors across the alley can see us in the shower, or if we can hear literally everything our building-mates say, can they hear us? City dwellers live in intimate proximity to each other, and while this fact isn't always a bad thing, sometimes the only refuge in a metropolitan environment is your home.

Japanese architect Takeshi Hosaka, known for his many unconventional designs, has come up with a new method for ensuring privacy in his new home, House in Zushi. Finished just last month, his method uses recessed flooring to create a significant barrier between residents and their neighbors.

The curved floors, while creating the barrier, are also designed to allow for ample sunlight to reach each room. The slabs of concrete in the windows are actually the ceilings of each story.

This special design may sacrifice spacial efficiency, since the barriers take up some room, but it certainly creates a unique living area that challenges how we think about privacy. Beautiful floors sure beat out black-out curtains and noise-cancelling headphones.

More photos of this cool design, including the architectural model for clarification:

[Spoon & Tamago]
Images: Japan-architects

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com