/>
X
Government

Feds stomp on Red Hat

A senior federal official has rebuked Linux vendor Red Hat over its criticism of the government's open-source software (OSS) takeup rate, arguing a measured approach may be "the right thing to do".Patrick Callioni, division manager at the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO), took issue today with comments by Red Hat Asia Pacific vice president Gus Robertson that agencies were up to three years behind their overseas counterparts in embracing open-source software.
zd-defaultauthor-renai-lemay.jpg
Written by Renai LeMay on
A senior federal official has rebuked Linux vendor Red Hat over its criticism of the government's open-source software (OSS) takeup rate, arguing a measured approach may be "the right thing to do".

Patrick Callioni, division manager at the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO), took issue today with comments by Red Hat Asia Pacific vice president Gus Robertson that agencies were up to three years behind their overseas counterparts in embracing open-source software.

"So what?," Callioni said. "It could be that governments have been slow because it might not have been the right thing to do," he told participants at the Australian Unix User Group's Open Computing in Government conference in Canberra.

"Don't judge the government on whether it uses more or less of something," he advised the company, "judge it on the value of the services it provides."

Callioni also took aim at the effectiveness of legislation mooted in jurisdictions such as South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory to mandate the consideration of OSS by government agencies.

"I would challenge governments that have enacted legislation to show any impact of that legislation," he said.

He said Australia had a shortfall of people with the capability of supporting commercial implementations of OSS.

There were only 300 to 400 small to medium enterprises in Australia that specialise in OSS, Callioni claimed. Of these, over 90 percent had less than five staff, some had around 30 employees, and few had more than 100 workers, he added.

Callioni told the audience that these companies made up a relatively small domestic industry, although it was considerably fluid and flexible.

Editorial standards

Related

How to use your phone to diagnose your car's 'check engine' light
BlueDriver Bluetooth dongle

How to use your phone to diagnose your car's 'check engine' light

Hackers are finding ways around multi-factor authentication. Here's what to watch for
a-man-looking-at-his-smartphone-while-sitting-at-a-computer-in-his-home-office

Hackers are finding ways around multi-factor authentication. Here's what to watch for

For $2, you can finally give your Mac an incredibly useful feature Windows has always had
cleanshot-2022-08-16-at-22-34-232x

For $2, you can finally give your Mac an incredibly useful feature Windows has always had