Gen Z uses channels to start social relationships with retailers

Generation Z works to be a part of their favorite brands -- using their channels as a way to start social relationships with retailers

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Connecting with customers is important for all businesses. But knowing how your customers want to receive your messages -- and understanding how this differs by age -- could be the key to improving your business relationships with your customers and potential customers.

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A recent survey shows that Generation Z (Gen Z) is more likely than any other generation to seek out positive conversation with retailers on social media compared to other age groups.

Sydney, NSW Australia-based retail technology company Fluent Commerce surveyed 5,000 Americans between the ages of 14 to 54.

It wanted to highlight faults in how businesses use traditional communication channels, and how best to utilize their current communications strategies.

One in four (24 percent) of Gen Z are signed up for at least 10 retail email subscription services and one in three (36 percent) of Gen Z check their emails once a day.

However, over two in five (41 percent), only open 10 percent of these emails, preferring to converse over Instagram, Twitter, and other social tools.

When opening emails, half (50 percent) of Gen Z claim they are more likely to open something from their favorite retailer.

The majority of millennials (49 percent) will only open the email if it offers the best deal. The survey also found that over two in five (42 percent) would prefer if retailers reached out via social media or text instead.

Comparatively, 77 percent of millennials would rather be reached out to via email.


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Over nine out of ten (94 percent) of Gen Z said they do not use social media to complain to, or about brands or retailers, in contrast to millennials. Almost one in three (31 percent) of millennials use social media to complain about their negative retail experiences.

Compared to other generational groups, Gen Z is most likely to seek out positive conversations with retailers using social media

The survey shows that Gen Z wants to be communicated with through social media, to enable them to forge relationships between both the brand and the consumer. However, millennials prefer to use their social channels to complain to, or about brands.

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Unfortunately, the majority of shoppers, across all ages and locations, do not feel that retailers are communicating with them effectively.

Brands will certainly need to rethink their communications strategies based on selected groups of customers. Targeting the right customers will give you the response you want.

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