Government rejects Bletchley rescue petition

The government has rejected a petition calling for extra funding to save Bletchley Park, the base for the UK's codebreakers during World War II.The petition, which gained just under 22,000 signatories before it shut on 28 May, asked the prime minister to rescue the historic site because it has funding for just two to three more years of survival.

The government has rejected a petition calling for extra funding to save Bletchley Park, the base for the UK's codebreakers during World War II.

The petition, which gained just under 22,000 signatories before it shut on 28 May, asked the prime minister to rescue the historic site because it has funding for just two to three more years of survival. "The Bletchley Park Trust receives no external funding," the petition read. "Please do not allow this crucial piece of both British and World culture to disappear."

"If ever an example were needed of Britain leading the world, this surely would be it. To allow it to fall into the hands of developers would be simply unconscionable."

On Wednesday, signatories to the petition received an email from the 10 Downing Street petitions website, linking to the government's response.

"The Government agrees that the buildings on the Bletchley Park site are of significant historic importance and, although recognising the excellent work being carried out there, at present it has no plans, nor the resources, to extend its sponsorship of museums and galleries beyond the present number," the response read.

Number 10 noted that the Bletchley Park Trust had applied again to the Heritage Lottery Fund, having been turned down last year.

"English Heritage, Milton Keynes Council and English Partnerships have worked jointly with the Trust that runs the Park to prepare a Conservation Management Plan for the site," the response added.

"English Partnerships has acquired some parts of the site and will ensure that any development of these areas is planned and delivered in a way that reflects the important historical nature of the Park. English Partnerships has also invested in the core site and contributed funds towards an emergency repair programme on Block D, the largest derelict wartime building in Britain, and is planning to undertake further substantial works to sensitively refurbish this important listed building."

The government turned down extra funding for Bletchley Park in May. In July, the Liberal Democrat MP Phil Willis filed an early day motion calling on the government to help out with the site's operational costs.