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Innovation

India's next targets: Google, Skype

India has instructed Google and Skype to allow its government to monitor their customer data or face being banned.
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Written by Natalie Gagliordi, Contributor on

India has instructed Google and Skype to allow its government to monitor their customer data or face being banned from operating in the world's second-most populated nation, according to a new report.

An AFP article on Tuesday confirmed previous reports that the U.S.-based search giant and VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) service provider were next in line, after Research In Motion, to face scrutiny from the Indian government. AFP said the request to monitor the companies' data will extend to virtual private networks as these services allow remote users to access their corporate network.

According to the newswire, notices will be sent out to the U.S. service providers starting on August 31, where the companies will have to comply with the government's directive or risk being shut down.

This development comes on the heels of the Indian government's move to provide RIM a 60-day grace period, during which government officials will evaluate the BlackBerry maker's counter-proposal to allow its wireless subscribers' communications to be monitored. One such proposal includes placing a RIM server in India to cater to the government's request.

For more of this story, read India: Hand over your data Google, Skype on ZDNet Asia.

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