Internal Microsoft projects get codename love, too

The latest version of my Microsoft Codename Tracker chart is done and ready for download. The theme of the month is internal codenames at Microsoft.

The latest version of my Microsoft Codename Tracker chart is done and ready for download.

The theme of the month is internal codenames at Microsoft. Think about it: Why should only commercial and research projects get all the Redmondian codename love? They don't. There are some Microsoft projects that aren't ever meant for public consumption that have received the codename treatment, too. I profile a couple of them -- Cosmos and D2 -- in the introduction to this month's codename tracker update.

This PDF is the same chart I use myself to keep up with the codenames of products and technologies coming from Microsoft. This newest version adds a number of new database- and cloud-specific codenames, plus updates to a number of the already-existing entries.

If you’ve already registered on ZDNet, you can just grab the latest version. If you haven’t, registration info will be requested before you download it. Whether you’re a Microsoft customer, partner, analyst, competitor (or even employee), you might find the Tracker useful.

New to the July edition are codenames like Daytona, Emondex, Metallica, O and Nuggets. I’ve also updated many of the existing entries, including but not limited to, BizTalk, Denali, Dryad, Mango and Roslyn.

If there’s a codename missing from my chart that you’d like me to check out and ultimately add, please don’t hesitate to contact me via e-mail. Just so you know: All e-mails I receive are treated as confidential — unless you want a mention/credit line, of course.

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