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Is MPS Just Another Purchasing Decision?

Doc has made it a point to highlight the human element in Managed Print Services – this isn’t just a case of more efficient purchasing of machines and supplies. MPS is about cultural change within an organization, and if you don’t have folks on board, the results won’t be as good.

Doc has made it a point to highlight the human element in Managed Print Services – this isn’t just a case of more efficient purchasing of machines and supplies. MPS is about cultural change within an organization, and if you don’t have folks on board, the results won’t be as good.

So I was pleased to see a good overview piece on MPS over at Print CEO, penned by Clint Bolte. Clint has a lot to say and it’s a pretty lengthy article, so I’d recommend following the link. But here’s a glimpse of a few of Clint’s thoughts:

A major human tendency objection to be overcome by all corporations trying to realize maximum savings from Managed Print Services precepts is getting knowledge workers to give up their desktop printers/faxes/scanners. Sprint has successfully eliminated desktop units by telling employees that they could buy their desktop units for home use by making a $25 contribution to the Sprint Foundation. The employee would then be responsible for the toner expense of their home units. Justin West of Nationwide said that his firm offered a series of prizes to employees who turned in their desktop inkjet units.

Though started only a decade or so ago with the advent of specialized software and multi-functional devices, Managed Print Services is quickly becoming the genre for the transition from a hardware concentric management issue to that of a knowledge worker productivity opportunity. Whether it is entirely outsourced or a blend of services from specialty vendors providing maintenance or supplies, MPS will surely be embraced by corporations of all sizes sooner rather than later. Many corporate in-plants can expand their mission and benefit the overall corporation as a result of closer relationships with their corporate IT departments to assist in the training of users on the MFD/MFPs.

Clint gives a lot of good examples including an interesting case study at Bob Jones University, which had 250 networked printers and 85 multi-function devices to serve 1,700 employees and 5,000 students before tackling an MPS program.