Limit disk usage for existing Windows 2000 users

Windows supports the use of disk quotas on NTFS volumes, which enables you to configure quota settings globally for a volume. However, you cannot set quotas differently on subfolders of a volume. You can set quotas differently for each user, if needed, giving specific users more or less space than others.

Windows 2000 Professional
Limit disk usage for existing Windows 2000 users

Windows supports the use of disk quotas on NTFS volumes, which enables you to configure quota settings globally for a volume. However, you cannot set quotas differently on subfolders of a volume. You can set quotas differently for each user, if needed, giving specific users more or less space than others.

To configure quotas on a volume, follow these steps:

  1. Open My Computer, right-click the volume, and choose Properties.
  2. Press the Quota tab, select Enable Quota Management, and click OK.
On the Quota tab, you configure settings that determine the amount of space allocated to each user and how Windows reacts when a user nears and/or exceeds the quota limit. If you set quota values here and take no other configuration action, all new users will receive the assigned quotas. Existing users will not have quotas assigned to them.

To configure quota assignments for existing users, which enables you to also set quotas differently per user, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Quota Entries button to open the Quota Entries window.
  2. Go to Quota | New Quota Entry.
  3. Choose or enter the user name, click Add, and then click OK.
  4. In the resulting Add New Quota Entry dialog box, choose the option Limit Disk Space To and set the maximum space in kilobytes and the warning level. Then, click OK.

Repeat the process to add quota entries for other existing users.

Windows 2000 Server


Create custom management consoles

The introduction of the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) was a big step forward in providing a seamless, consistent interface for administration and management in Windows Server platforms. Not only does the MMC provide a common interface through which administrators can manage servers and services, but it also enables administrators to create custom management consoles that bring together any combination of administrative tools.

It's a relatively easy process to add snap-ins for specific tasks to a single MMC console. Follow these steps:

  1. Go to Start | Run, and enter MMC in the Open text box.
  2. In the MMC, choose Console, and select Add/Remove Snap-in.
  3. Click Add, choose a snap-in from the list, and click Add.
  4. If prompted, specify any additional information, add other snap-ins as needed, and click Close.
  5. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, click the Extensions tab.
  6. By default, the MMC adds all extensions for a selected snap-in, but you can remove some if you don't need them. Deselect the Add All Extensions check box, and then deselect the check boxes for each extension you want to omit from the console.
  7. Click OK.
You might prefer to use a taskpad view for certain snap-ins, which provides a graphical interface for the snap-in and can simplify accomplishing frequent tasks with the console.

To create a taskpad view, follow these steps:
  1. Select the snap-in in the left pane, and choose Action | New Taskpad View.
  2. Use the wizard to specify the taskpad view type and other settings.
  3. After you click Finish, the MMC starts the New Task Wizard, which you can use to add specific commands to the taskpad and set properties such as description and icon.
  4. To add other tasks after the wizard completes, go to Actions | Edit Taskpad View.
  5. On the Tasks tab, click New to start the New Task Wizard again.

To use the MMC effectively, try creating a custom console that comprises the snap-ins you use most often. For example, if you manage a large number of DNS domains and Web services, you might combine the IIS and DNS consoles.