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Pano Logic adds remote access in version 2.6

Pano Logic has been offering desktop virtualization products since 2007 if my memory serves me well. Their take on desktop virtualization is based upon a a cute little box having ports for a monitor, keyboard, mouse and other things, called a Zero Client.
Written by Dan Kusnetzky, Contributor on

Pano Logic has been offering desktop virtualization products since 2007 if my memory serves me well. Their take on desktop virtualization is based upon a a cute little box having ports for a monitor, keyboard, mouse and other things, called a Zero Client. The high level view is that the Pano device largely does what a thin client does. There is no customer installable software running in this device, however. Pano just launched version 2.6 of their product and added a way to remotely access virtual desktops.

As this graphic from their Website shows, the Pano device communicates with the Pano Desktop Service which, in turn, works with the Windows operating system.

Figure showing Pano Desktop Service

What's new in version 2.6?

Here's how Pano Logic presents version 2.6:

Pano Logic®, the leader in centralized virtual desktops, today announced the newest addition to their product line, Pano Remote, as well as a new version of their flagship product, Pano System 2.6. With the easy to carry Pano Remote USB key, users can now access their Pano managed virtual desktops conveniently and securely when working out of the office away from their Pano devices—without requiring a costly or complex VPN solution. New features of Pano System 2.6 include integration with Pano Remote, easier installation of the Pano Manager virtual appliance using the Open Virtualization Format (OVF), a new interface called the Collection Creation Wizard for easier configuration of policies for provisioning and managing desktop virtual machines, the ability for administrators to control virtual desktop power state directly from the Pano Manager administrator console, graphic identification and authorization (GINA) application interoperability and standalone VMware ESXi support for small single-server deployments.

Snapshot Analysis -->

Snapshot analysis

Pano finds itself competing with products offered by HP, Wyse and others. It also faces adjacent market competition from different approaches offered by Citrix, Microsoft and VMware. Pano is trying to find ways to differentiate its offerings from its larger, better funded competitors. Finding a way to allow customers to deploy zero clients in the office and also allow mobile staff members to access systems using a PC at a hotel, customer site, or other location using a USB "key" is the newest attempt to differentiate Pano's offerings from the rest.

Having traveled with a handheld computer, I know the joys of going through airport security without havig to "field strip" my briefcase and put my notebook computer through security separately. I also know the limitations in both the screen and the keyboard of such systems. Being able to use a customer's machine, a machine at an office supply store or a hotel kiosk has some benefits, but, of course also means that the mobile staff member may not be able to work while in an airplane, on a train, or in a taxi.

Unasked for advice -->

Unasked for shoot-from-the-hip advice

Pano, your technology looks intriging.  I've played with one of your devices at your booth at a show and found it to be very usable. Staff at financial services, health care and other highly regulated environments would most certainly be able to accomplish their goals using this device. The key issue seems that Pano Logic isn't on many organization's radar screens.  If decision makers aren't aware of Pano, they won't consider its products and, of course, people who don't know of a company and its products aren't very likely to buy anything from them.

You have some fantastic customer references why not build a "customers give a thumbs up to zero client computing" campaign using short videos of decision makers? Show how much easier this world is to live in than one that makes staff members fight with a desktop or notebook system.

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