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Innovation

The Morning Briefing: 2012 changes to health regulations

"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-read stories from the web. This morning we're reading about regulation in health industries.
Written by Charlie Osborne, Contributing Writer on

"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-read stories from the web. This morning we're reading about regulation in health industries.

1. U.S to regulate face and hand transplants. The U.S government wants to start regulating face and hand transplants in the same manner as kidneys, hearts and other donated organs currently are --implementing the use of waiting lists on a nationwide scale. A dozen U.S hospitals currently perform face and hand transplants, and there is an estimated 200 troops returning from abroad that may be eligible for face transplants. A structured regulatory system may increase access to these operations.

2. The U.K breast implants scandal highlights a need for regulation in the private sector. As the PIP implant scandal continues, the French government has offered to remove implants from the 30,000 women affected in France. In comparison, U.K women who attended private clinics will only have implants removed by the National Health Service if the clinic has gone out of business or refuses.

3. Nurses forced to make hourly rounds in hospital. The Prime minister wants to decrease paperwork that healthcare professionals have to complete, and increase the time they spend 'on the floor' in hospitals. On a recent hospital visit, Cameron stated that nurses will be forced to undertake hourly rounds, and members of the public will be allowed to inspect hospitals.

4. Report: Most hospital errors go unreported. Only one out of seven medical errors that harm Medicare patients are reported by hospital employees. Daniel R. Levinson, the Inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services, said even after medical facilities investigate reported injuries or infections, the facility rarely changes its practices. This potentially shows a woeful lack of 'duty of care' towards patients.

5. Corporate hospitals, India, plan to set up 'self regulatory' patrols. After the blaze at AMRI hospital claimed 94 lives, the government has been forced to act to try and prevent the same tragedy repeating itself. While government agencies have placed 1,000 hospitals on notice over safety standards, the Association of Super Specialty Hospitals (ASHA) stated it is going to set up a task force to bring in self-regulation among its member hospitals. Pitched regulations to be implemented include fire-resistant staff uniforms and pressurised ventilation.

(Image credit: Lori Greig/Flickr)

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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