Wanted: social news scammers

In response to the revelation that top users of Digg are routinely offered bribes by companies hoping to get their story onto the front page, the ever-controversial Jason Calcanis is offering his own bribe - this time to users who'll dish the dirt.

In response to the revelation that top users of Digg are routinely offered bribes by companies hoping to get their story onto the front page, the ever-controversial Jason Calcanis is offering his own bribe - this time to users who'll dish the dirt:

I'd like to try and out the advertisers and marketing firms on digg (and maybe even Netscape, who knows) that are paying folks to submit news for them. If you know of a firm doing this send me their name, the email they sent you, the URL of the story on digg/netscape, and/or who they are paying. If your tip pans out I'll send you $100 via paypal. Yep, I'll pay you for ratting these folks out.

All information given will be 100% confidential, as is standard procedure in these matters. The problem of course will be ensuring that the info given is genuine. As one commenter on Calcanis' blog, notes:

Jason, I respect what you're trying to do here. Just know that by offering to pay for a tip, you are inviting people with shaky proof of this activity to send it to you in the hopes of getting $100. The simple fact that you're paying for this information will make it less credible. (Whistle-blowers don't get paid, otherwise everyone would be trying to dig up dirt on their bosses.) Granted, $100 isn't a lot of cash, but still, this is why journalists don't pay sources.