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X-Box: The big picture

An overall look at the controversy and glitz surrounding the X-Box launch
Written by ZDNet UK, Contributor on

Microsoft turned its attention from business and home desktop computer systems to the less familiar territory of high-end gaming on Friday with the announcement of its much anticipated X-Box console.

The event was not without controversy, however. At the last minute, Microsoft mysteriously decided to shun expected partner AMD in favour of its traditional microprocessor pal Intel. Question marks also remain over Microsoft's ability to capture gamers' attention from the likes of Sony and Sega, as well as deliver the console as planned.

Here is a round-up of all the news surrounding one of Microsoft's biggest ever gambles.

  • AMD licks its wounds Did Intel win the X-Box deal at the 11th hour? Mon, 13 March, 2000,
  • X-Box delays and extra costs for Europe? As per usual, UK gamers may have to wait longer than Japanese and American customers for X-Box. Fri, 10 Mar 2000
  • Opinion: X-Box dumps AMD Observers say Microsoft's decision to dump AMD in favour of an Intel processor is not surprising. Fri, 10 Mar 2000
  • Official: X-Box will use Intel New Microsoft games console won't use AMD's Athlon chip as expected. Fri, 10 Mar 2000
  • Microsoft rips the veil off X-Box Bill Gates and a bevy of third-party developers talk about Microsoft's long-rumoured entry into the game console market, slated for release in autumn 2001. Fri, 10 Mar 2000
  • The battle for your living room Microsoft readies itself to enter the gaming market and go head-to-head in the living room with Sony, Nintendo and Sega. Wed, 8 Mar 2000
  • Bill Gates is like a pushy salesman. If he can get one foot in the door, he'll barge on through. Go to AnchorDesk UK with Jesse Berst for the news comment.

    I love games, so take me to Gamespot immediately.

    Go to the AnchorDesk UK Talkback forum on the Microsoft X-Box.

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