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Zip Express offers door-to-door recycling

Here's a resource for the lazy among you or just the ones who don't want to waste a whole lot of fuel driving your old electronics to the nearest tech-savvy recycling center. I don't even know where mine is, but the last time there was a nearby recycling event, it was at least 10 miles away.
Written by Heather Clancy, Contributor on

Here's a resource for the lazy among you or just the ones who don't want to waste a whole lot of fuel driving your old electronics to the nearest tech-savvy recycling center. I don't even know where mine is, but the last time there was a nearby recycling event, it was at least 10 miles away.

Zip Express Installation is actually, like it sounds, an installation services company that handles anything from getting your new high-definition television up and running to corporate computer rollouts. But for $79.95, they will come and pick up any large technology items that you can't figure out how to get rid of yourself and bring it to a certified technology recycling locations. Not bad if you're someone who's got a five-story walk-up apartment and some disposable income. (Personally, $80 isn't exactly cheap.)

The company, which offers nationwide coverage, will handle computers, phones, cameras, PC peripherals, televisions, monitors and amplifiers. The catch is the $79.95 price only covers one item (so make it good). And, if you're getting rid of an old computer, it is your responsibility to get rid of the data on the hard drive. If you're having them install something else, the recycling haul-away cost is $49.

Zip Express does offer some corporate services, as well.

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