Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Natalie Gagliordi

Natalie Gagliordi is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Louisville, Kentucky, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously worked as the editor of Kiosk Marketplace, an online B2B trade publication that focused on interactive self-service technology, while also contributing to additional websites that covered retail technology, digital signage hardware and mobile payment trends. Natalie attended George Washington University, where she studied communication sciences, and also the University of South Florida, where she received a B.A. in News-Editorial Journalism.

Latest Posts

Apple releases Tiger to developers

Apple releases Tiger to developers

According to an e-mail I received from the Apple Developer Connection (ADC), a developer-oriented preview release of version 10.4 of Mac OS X (code-named Tiger) is now available for purchase from Apple for $500.

October 19, 2004 by in Apple

Google desktop search not evil says Seltzer

Google desktop search not evil says Seltzer

eWeek Security Center editor Larry Seltzer tears apart Google's Desktop Search (GDS) software and then puts it back together and concludes that most of the criticisim being levied against Google, particularly in the areas of security and privacy, are FUD. In his findings, Seltzer says, "[Google's] privacy policy says, among other things, 'Your computer's content is not made accessible to Google or anyone else without your explicit permission.

October 19, 2004 by in Google

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