Steve O'Hear

Steve O'Hear is a London-based consultant, educator, and journalist, focussing on the Internet and all aspects of digital technology. He advises businesses and not-for-profit organisations on how to exploit the collaborative and publishing opportunities offered by the Web, and has written for numerous publications including The Guardian and Macworld. Steve is also the director of a new documentary on Silicon Valley, called <a href="http://www.insearchofthevalley.com">In Search of the Valley</a>, and in 2002 was made a fellow of the UK's National Endowment for Science, Technology, and the Art.</p>

Latest Posts

LinkedIn has the answers

LinkedIn has the answers

LinkedIn, the social network for "professionals" that people either seem to love or hate (I'm a recent convert) has added a new feature whereby users can submit and answer questions -- limited to people within their own network or the wider LinkedIn community.

January 4, 2007 by in Networking

Deleting Online Predators Act: R.I.P.

Deleting Online Predators Act: R.I.P.

It looks like the Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) has died a slow death. DOPA was proposed during the height of last year's moral panic around the issue of child safety and sites like MySpace. The legislation would have banned the use of commercial social networking websites in US schools and libraries which receive federal IT funding -- therefore undermining much of the pioneering work being done by educators in the e-learning 2.0 space.

January 3, 2007 by in Social Enterprise

Digg's seven-step recovery program

Digg's seven-step recovery program

Muhammad Saleem has written a short paper outlining seven steps that Digg needs to take in order to achieve success in 2007. For those that don't know, Saleem is one of the site's top 'diggers' (currently ranked 20), and regularly posts commentary on the social news scene on his own blog - including helping to expose the fact that some of the top users of Digg are being paid to promote certain stories.

January 2, 2007 by in Enterprise Software

Could 2007 be the year of social network fatigue?

Could 2007 be the year of social network fatigue?

In Read/WriteWeb's 2007 Web Predictions, Richard MacManus et al. suggested (albeit slightly tongue in cheek) that we might see a social network backlash, with users deciding that participation in social networks is consuming too much of their time. To stop this from coming true, I argue that social networks need to open up.

January 2, 2007 by in Social Enterprise

Second Life: Don't believe the hype

Second Life: Don't believe the hype

Clay Shirky is on a mission to debunk the 'resident' numbers of Second Life that are routinely published by the game's makers (Linden Lab) and subsequently banded about by bloggers and journalists alike. And he's doing a pretty good job.

December 25, 2006 by in Tech Industry

YouTube's most wanted

YouTube's most wanted

Could YouTube become a useful tool in the fight against crime? A police officer in Canada thinks so, and has posted a surveillance video onto the site in an appeal for information.

December 19, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Do ordinary users care about data portability? And if not, should they? Four social networks respond.

Do ordinary users care about data portability? And if not, should they? Four social networks respond.

Outside of the web 2.0 crowd, do users of social software really care about such technicalities as data export? Why should companies support data portability? I put these questions (along with a few others) to four leading developers in the social networking space. Marc Canter (People Aggregator), Andrew Anker (Vox), Tim Spalding (LibraryThing), and Ben Werdmuller (Elgg).

December 13, 2006 by in Data Centers

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