/>
X

Why does the new iPhone use old Wi-Fi technology?

Apple’s upcoming iPhone uses an 802.11b/g radio, which won’t matter to a lot of people.
zd-defaultauthor-rik-fairlie.jpg
Written by Rik Fairlie on

Apple’s upcoming iPhone uses an 802.11b/g radio, which won’t matter to a lot of people. But a friend, who has installed 802.11n routers in her apartment because of crippling interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range, mentioned this shortcoming the other day.

I suspect that Apple went with the older technology to wring as much battery power as possible from the new iPhone. The move to a faster 3G network was already a significant power challenge to Apple, and it didn’t need another. Also, I’m not sure that 802.11n chipsets for mobile devices are available yet. Companies such as Redpine Signals and Broadcom have announced 802.11n chipsets for mobile devices, but I haven’t seen the newer Wi-Fi technology in any phones, including the upcoming BlackBerry Bold and the Samsung Instinct. So it’s likely that Apple simply didn’t have a choice in Wi-Fi technology.

Anyway, it won’t matter to most people, since Wi-Fi hotspots use 802.11g Wi-Fi. But as 802.11n becomes increasingly popular, some home users may wish for the newer technology. Especially those who have a lot of interference in the 2.4GHz range.

Related

McDonald's and Chick-fil-A both have a big problem. Only one has a solution
screen-shot-2022-06-28-at-6-24-27-pm.png

McDonald's and Chick-fil-A both have a big problem. Only one has a solution

Business
On July 12, we'll see the universe like never before
51656393132-ca88bc21e3-k

On July 12, we'll see the universe like never before

Space
Chick-fil-A has a problem that's out of control (and technology can't fix it)
screen-shot-2022-03-14-at-9-38-08-am.png

Chick-fil-A has a problem that's out of control (and technology can't fix it)

Enterprise Software