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Innovation

Cox cuts three tons of paper by moving to e-procurement

Cox Communications has eliminated more than three tons of paper from its procurement processes by switching to an electronic procurement strategy.
Written by Heather Clancy, Contributor on

How's this for a sustainability diet?

Cox Communications has eliminated three and one-third tons of paper from its procurement processes over the past eight months by switching to an electronic procurement strategy. That's approximately 19,740 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

The company's new system integrates existing financial applications from the Oracle E-Business Suite and Oracle Imaging and Process Management with applications that are part of the Oracle iProcurement suite.

The latter is actually pitched more as a way to add discipline and accountability to procurement workflows, but there are obvious green features. Plus, Cox reports that it already has reduced its costs related to processing vendor invoices by around 80 percent through the process and it has reduced the amount of transactions related to accounts payable by 26 percent. (Aside from the paper consumption reduction that already has been stated.)

Here's an observation from Bill Fitzsimmons, vice president of corporate finance and chief accounting offer for Cox Communications.

"We are making a huge company-wide push to reduce our environmental impact and set the benchmark for sustainability within the communications industry. In doing so, we have used the Oracle E-Business Suite and Oracle Imaging and Process Management as one of the solutions to replace many manual processes and eliminate the need for literally millions of sheets of paper. Within the first eight months alone, this has enabled us to increase efficiencies, reduce costs and save almost 20,000 pounds of CO2 emissions."

Cox Enterprises, parent of Cox Communications, has pledged to cut its carbon footprint by up to 20 percent by 2017 through its Cox Conserves campaign. So far, the company has sliced roughly 118,000 tons. It still has 166,000 to go.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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