Microsoft's baffling new launch: 'All-new' Windows 1.0 with MS-Dos Executive

Microsoft has fun on Twitter teasing a new release of Windows 1.0 and all its apps, including the game Reversi.

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Microsoft's Twitter account adopted a Bill and Ted persona yesterday to announce Windows 1.0 from 1985. The company hasn't explained what it's planning but told a fan to "just take a chill pill and enjoy the ride, man".  

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The only clue Microsoft is offering is that it will be "Introducing the all-new Windows 1.0, with MS-Dos Executive, Clock, and more".

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The short video kicks off with the Windows 10 logo to a 1980s synth pop track and goes back in time through all the Windows branding, ending on the Windows 1.0 logo. Microsoft has also changed its Twitter profile to the Windows 1.0 logo. 

Taken at face value, this should mean Microsoft is planning to release Windows 1.0 in some new form. Or it's a joke for no apparent reason. But why tease an "all-new" Windows 1.0 unless there was no plan to do it?

One good guess, as per Windows Central, is that Microsoft may be planning to open-source Windows 1.0 as it's done with and MS-DOS and more recently the Windows Calculator app, which are both hosted on Microsoft-owned open-source code repository GitHub.  

Another theory from Neowin is that Microsoft is playing on the soon to be released new season of Stranger Things, which is set in 1985. 

Assuming Microsoft is releasing Windows 1.0 as open source, it is promising it will have the game Reversi included "big time" for fans and that this thing will be "guaranteed gnarly". 

"Windows 1.0, coming to you soon," Microsoft tweeted. "And reversi.exe." 

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