Miniature digital cameras capture Albatross, Killer Whale moment

In strange but true news, tiny digital cameras have proven to be useful in capturing inexplicable wildlife moments, such as a killer whale and an albatross sharing a meal. Shooting every 30 seconds for a total of 10,000 photos, the 83-gram cameras were placed on the birds' backs as they soared above the sea predators while foraging for fish food alongside each other.

In strange but true news, tiny digital cameras have proven to be useful in capturing inexplicable wildlife moments, such as a killer whale and an albatross sharing a meal. Shooting every 30 seconds for a total of 10,000 photos, the 83-gram cameras were placed on the birds' backs as they soared above the sea predators while foraging for fish food alongside each other. Unfortunately, most of the pictures didn't come out well, as they were either too dark, blurred or covered by feathers. Of course.

While it might not sound like much, its definitely caught a buzz online with coverage around the world in the science sections of MSNBC, the Times of London and Wired. Using the animals as tripods for miniature cameras is quite innovative. Quite the step up from Reuters pigeons. Do you think using animals for such scientific discoveries is useful, or is it dangerous for the animals?

(Photo via Wired)