Poll: Why are you still using Windows 7?

According to analytics data for tens of millions of website visits, as many as 10% of you are still running Windows 7. Rather than speculate on the reasons why, I've put together a poll. Come back next week to see the results.

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Update: The poll is now closed. Here are the results.

Statistically speaking, one in 11 people reading this post on a PC are running Windows 7. That's not speculation or guesswork. That's what the ZDNet server logs for the last 90 days say. Some 85.8% of the many millions of PC-based visitors to this site are running Windows 10. Of the remainder, 9.2% are running Windows 7, which is twice as many as the Windows 8/8.1 population.

That data lines up pretty closely to public data from the United States Government's massive Digital Analytics Program, which measures visits to more than 400 websites run by the Federal Government. Over the same three-month period, their mix of traffic from PCs consisted of 85.9% Windows 10, 10.0% Windows 7, and 3.7% Windows 8.x.

That's a fairly significant drop from the last snapshot I looked at, which counted Windows 7's share of visitors at 18.9% in the 90 days leading up to that operating system's January 14, 2020 end of support deadline. (See "It's 2020: How many PCs are still running Windows 7?")

The glass-half-full crowd says it's a good thing that half the population has stopped using Windows 7 in the nine months since Microsoft ended support for it. But I'm curious why so many are continuing to use Windows 7 past its expiration date.

Rather than speculate, I put together a poll. Thanks to the more than 3,200 people who responded. I'll share the results next week.