​Tumblr to cooperate with Korean authorities to monitor porn

Tumblr has agreed to better monitor illegal porn distribution with South Korean authorities after initially refusing to do so.

Tumblr has agreed to better monitor the spread of illegal adult content on the South Korean version of its website, the local internet content watchdog has said.

The Korea Communications Standards Commission (KCSC) said the US company has promised to actively cooperate with the commission. The two will also find reasonable solutions in areas where US and Korean laws differ.

KCSC said the two will work actively together where laws are similar, such as child pornography.

Last year, the KCSC requested the social blogging site to delete posts related to prostitution and porn. The company refused and said it was based in the US and subject to local laws.

The KCSC sent 30,200 requests to internet service providers to delete posts related to prostitution and porn from January to June in 2017. Requests to Tumblr accounted for over two-thirds, totaling 22,468. By comparison, Twitter received 1,771, Instagram 12, and Facebook five.

Tumblr has placed links for users to report illegal content on its site as well as its mobile app.

Thanks in large part to the Me Too movement that started last year, South Korean authorities have stepped up monitoring of illegal content distributed online. P2P file sharing operators are now required to better monitor distribution of illegal content and post warnings to users.

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