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What business jobs don't require public speaking?

Do you want a high-paying business career without all the verbal presentations? We rounded up business jobs with no public speaking required.
Written by Melissa Sartore on

Around one-third of Americans fear public speaking, according to a 2021 survey by Chapman University. If you're part of that 29%, finding a job with no public speaking required might be a high priority for you.

In the business world, many positions have little need for public speaking. These roles are available to accountants, marketers, and human resource professionals, among others. Many of the positions involve numbers, data analysis, and writing. 

All jobs require some amount of communication. Public speaking may be an occasional part of your job, but it's not the backbone of these positions. 

Keep in mind that developing public speaking skills can help you on the job market and as you advance your career. Public speaking often accompanies managerial and executive roles. 

Ranking method

To identify the jobs with no public speaking that will help you build your business career, we used information gathered from O*NET and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). 

O*NET asked business and finance professionals how often they perform public speaking at their jobs. Respondents assigned a number between zero and 100, with zero meaning "never" and 100 meaning "every day." The BLS provides insights into average salaries across the country.

These business jobs, on average, require public speaking less than once a month and pay more than the national mean salary of $56,310 as of May 2020. 

Business and financial jobs with no public speaking

7. Compensation, benefits, or job analysis specialist

  • Frequency of public speaking: 28
  • Annual mean salary: $67,190
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): 10%
  • Minimum education: Bachelor's degree
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

These HR professionals perform an array of tasks depending on their specialty. Compensation specialists oversee how an organization pays employees. They assess compensation policies and practices across the marketplace and adhere to applicable laws and regulations.

Benefits specialists focus on retirement, insurance, and other programs that employees receive as supplements to their wages. Job analysis specialists write job descriptions, prepare salary officers, and research and adjust changing job requirements as needed. 

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists can advance in their fields through on-the-job training or by earning an online MBA. An MBA in human resources online is especially useful for individuals in these roles. 

6. Search marketing strategist

  • Frequency of public speaking: 28
  • Annual mean salary: $65,810
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): 22%
  • Minimum education: Bachelor's degree
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Search marketing strategists conduct market research to help sell goods and services. Search marketing strategists apply mathematical, research, and analytical skills. They use data to track market conditions and trends. Findings are reported to fellow marketing professionals and clients. 

Depending on the role, a search marketing strategist may need business analytics certification credentials. 

5. Accountant or auditor

  • Frequency of public speaking: 25
  • Annual mean salary: $73,560
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): 7%
  • Minimum education: Bachelor's degree
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Public and private accountants prepare and examine financial documents for individuals and organizations. They prep taxes, oversee accounting books and systems, assess financial data, and follow applicable regulations and laws. 

Certified public accountants need more than an online accounting degree and must meet the requisite education and experience guidelines established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Auditors may work within organizations or as outside consultants. They assess individual or organizational finances to identify, eliminate, or report mismanagement, waste, or risk. 

4. Budget analyst

  • Frequency of public speaking: 25
  • Annual mean salary: $78,970
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): 5%
  • Minimum education: Bachelor's degree
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Budget analysts often earn an accounting, finance, or economics degree to prepare them for their role in planning an organization's budget. These professionals prepare and assess budget reports, monitor spending, document income, and identify ways to save money. 

Budget analysts also determine future budget needs and ensure financial records' accuracy and completeness. They may oversee funding requests and budget approvals.

3. Claim adjuster, examiner, or investigator

  • Frequency of public speaking: 25
  • Annual mean salary: $68,270
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): -3%
  • Minimum education: High school diploma or some college coursework
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Claims adjusters, examiners, and investigators assess insurance claims. Claims adjusters look at property damage or personal injuries and identify how much an insurance company should. Claims examiners make sure the claimants and adjusters have followed the rules and regulations. 

Because claim adjusters aim to save insurance companies money, claimants may hire their own public adjusters. 

Claims investigators look at suspicious claims that may involve fraud or criminal activity. They may conduct interviews and surveillance.

2. Insurance underwriter

  • Frequency of public speaking: 23
  • Annual mean salary: $71,790
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): -2%
  • Minimum education: Bachelor's degree
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Insurance underwriters determine whether or not an insurance company provides a policy. They also set the policy's terms. Insurance underwriters often specialize in life, health, or property and casualty insurance.

Insurance underwriters identify the risk of issuing insurance by looking at records and conducting interviews. Insurance underwriters suggest coverage and premiums if and when they recommend a policy. 

1. Executive administrative assistant

  • Frequency of public speaking: 10
  • Annual mean salary: $63,110 
  • Projected job growth (2020-30): -7%
  • Minimum education: High school diploma or some college coursework
  • Minimum experience: One year or less

Executive administrative assistants support managers and executives. They manage schedules, prepare communications, answer phone calls, and make travel arrangements. Executive administrative assistants often handle high-level financial, statistical, and confidential information. 

Vital skills include communication and customer service. Executive administrative assistants may oversee clerical staff and serve as office managers.

In conclusion

Whether you're just entering the workforce or have an MBA, all jobs require communication. Public speaking doesn't have to be part of the deal. 

With the right business skills, educational background, and interests, you can find a job with no public speaking in any industry. Check out our list of MBA jobs for introverts for more options.

Unless otherwise noted, salary and projected growth data comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics as of Feb. 23, 2022.

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