6 reasons not to switch to Safari on a PC

When I installed Vista Ultimate in Boot Camp recently, the first thing I did (after patching up Windows and installing Norton AntiVirus, that is) was install iTunes, QuickTime and Safari for Windows. What can I say, the tools that I'm familiar with on the Mac side make using Windows a little easier for me.

Safari icon
When I installed Vista Ultimate in Boot Camp recently, the first thing I did (after patching up Windows and installing Norton AntiVirus, that is) was install iTunes, QuickTime and Safari for Windows. What can I say, the tools that I'm familiar with on the Mac side make using Windows a little easier for me.

Not everyone is as enthused as I was about running Safari for Windows though. Tomer Tishgarten has penned a blog post called 6 Reasons Why You Should Not Switch to Safari for PC. Some of his beefs are cosmetic, i.e. refitting the browser window to the desktop is challenging (par for the course on the Mac) and your Web site won’t look/work correctly (mine was fine).

Some of his other gripes are more serious, i.e. Safari for Windows' non-existent plug-in support (true) and the fact that importing bookmarks is not a part of the installation process (it has to be done post install).

While I agree with Tishgarten that Safari for Windows gives developers one less reason to justify buy a Mac, it's a calculated risk that Apple's taking in exchange for having more applications available for iPhone at launch. It seems pretty obvious to me that Safari for Windows is nothing more than an iPhone development tool.