Act quickly? What government they talking about? One not invented yet?

Well, folks, there's another United Nations report due out this fall. Today Reuters tells what's in the research summary that will shape that report.

Well, folks, there's another United Nations report due out this fall. Today Reuters tells what's in the research summary that will shape that report. Reuters saw a "table indicating worsening damage such as bleached corals, coastal flooding, increasing costs of treating disease, deaths from heatwaves and rising risks of extinctions of species of animals and plants."

But that's not the really jolly part of this expected report. It'll be out in November after a meeting in Valencia, Spain. No, the report actually brazenly suggests governments around the world act quickly. Now, speaking as an American, we can count votes by computer, spend money like there's no tormorrow (nice image in this context), blow up a house anywhere on earth in a split second, debate all the crucial issues for Presidential candidates in 90-second sound-bites, post a video on youtube in a couple minutes. But, act quickly on global warming? Fergeddaboutit, buddy.

One reason the U.N. staffers want action: "a European Union goal of holding temperature rises to a maximum 2 Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times is almost out of reach."

The report also says a centuries-long rise in sea levels is inevitable. Beachfront property for sale now in Baton Rouge and Poughkeepsie. Here's my look at that sinking feeling over in London.