Analyst: Breach revelations part of campaign for new funds, powers

No doubt, you have seen the news that F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program was breached by hackers, with all signs pointing to China. The Post reports that Lockheed Martin and the Pentagon are saying that no serious compromises occurred:"We know we are probed on this every day.

No doubt, you have seen the news that F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program was breached by hackers, with all signs pointing to China. The Post reports that Lockheed Martin and the Pentagon are saying that no serious compromises occurred:

"We know we are probed on this every day. We have very aggressive defensive systems. The more sensitive the information, the greater the safeguards are," said Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman. He said he was not aware of any sensitive F-35 technology having been compromised by a cyber-attack.

And this just as the 60-day cybersecurity review is about to be completed. Coincidence?

Andrew Storms, at nCircle, says the rash of recent revelations has the scent of a campaign. In an email, he told me:

The recent rash of breach disclosures can mean one thing, the federal government is greasing the wheels for more money and new legislation. This is a classic tactic both in government and private sector business. You first build up awareness for your cause, then instill some FUD, then you come in the most innovated looking proposal to solve all the issues. A word to anyone emotionally caught up in the Chinese super hackers taking over the US networks - perspective.

And at the RSA conference, we should see some tip of the hand from cybersecurity lead Melissa Hathaway.

Chances are we will hear more promotion of the public/private sector partnerships strategic goal, but this time the plans will also include significant sticks.