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Innovation

Best Buy lawyer falsified emails in class action suit

When it rains it pours buckets of legal problem for Best Buy, who had another predicament sprung on them the other day. One of the lawyers who is defending the company against a class-action lawsuit has confessed to "faking two e-mails and a memo" related to the suit, reports Ars Technica.
Written by Richard Koman, Contributor on

When it rains it pours buckets of legal problem for Best Buy, who had another predicament sprung on them the other day. One of the lawyers who is defending the company against a class-action lawsuit has confessed to "faking two e-mails and a memo" related to the suit, reports Ars Technica.

The trouble started when a class-action suit was brought against Best Buy in 2003 for signing up new computer owners for MSN trials without permission. The customers were then charged unknowingly after the trial was over. People complained to Best Buy and to Microsoft, also a party to the suit.

But the plot thickens.

Recently, one of the company's main attorneys in the case, Timothy Block, admitted that he had falsified two emails and one internal memo in order to make Best Buy look better. Block says that he forged the documents on his own and that no one at his firm or at Best Buy was aware of what he had done.

The judges may decide to issue a default judgment against Best Buy. If that happens, the company would owe millions of dollars to the plaintiffs, and Microsoft would be off the hook. Best Buy was also recently sued a year ago by Winternals, a software developer that accused Best Buy's Geek Squad of using an expensive piece of diagnostic software across the country without bothering to pay for a license. To add insult to injury, a Geek Squad technician was recently caught peeping when he allegedly placed his cell phone in the bathroom, where it a 22 year- woman showering. The technician recorded himself setting up the shot. Oops.

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